Reasonable Duration of Clopidogrel Use After Drug-Eluting Stent Implantation in Korean Patients

Dong Ho Shin, In Ho Chae, Tae Jin Youn, Sung Il Cho, Dong A. Kwon, Jung Won Suh, Hyuk-Jae Chang, Young Seok Cho, Woo Young Chung, Young Jin Choi, Hyeon Cheol Gwon, Kyoo Rok Han, Dong Ju Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Current guidelines recommend that clopidogrel be given to patients for 12 months after drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation. However, the evidence is insufficient to support the benefit of long-term clopidogrel therapy, especially in Asian patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether different durations of clopidogrel use might influence long-term outcomes after DES implantation. A total of 844 patients from 4 medical centers in Korea who had undergone successful DES implantation from November 2004 to April 2006 were enrolled. Patients who were event free at 6-month follow-up were divided into 2 groups by clopidogrel use (575 users, 163 nonusers) and followed. The end point was a composite of death, myocardial infarction, and stent thrombosis. During 1,056.4 patient-years of follow-up (median 2.02), there were 7 deaths, 3 myocardial infarctions, and 2 episodes of stent thrombosis. No significant differences in the primary end point were observed between clopidogrel users and nonusers (cumulative incidence 2.9% vs 2.8%, p = 0.578; adjusted hazard ratio 0.67, 95% confidence interval 0.16 to 2.77). In analysis with time-dependent covariates, the incidence rates of the primary end point during observation periods with and without clopidogrel were similar, although the effect estimates were broad (9.9 with and 10.6 without clopidogrel per 1,000 patient-years; adjusted hazard ratio 0.52, 95% confidence interval 0.09 to 3.17). Interestingly, the effect estimates from propensity score analyses, although they also had wide confidence intervals, were closer to the null than those from conventional Cox analyses. In conclusion, this cohort of Korean patients failed to show an absolute benefit of long-term clopidogrel therapy after DES implantation. The benefit of clopidogrel use beyond 6 months after DES implantation remains uncertain, and hence the decision to use long-term dual-antiplatelet therapy should be based on the risk factors of each patient.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1668-1673
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume104
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Dec 15

Fingerprint

clopidogrel
Drug-Eluting Stents
Confidence Intervals
Stents
Thrombosis
Myocardial Infarction
Propensity Score
Incidence
Korea

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Shin, D. H., Chae, I. H., Youn, T. J., Cho, S. I., Kwon, D. A., Suh, J. W., ... Choi, D. J. (2009). Reasonable Duration of Clopidogrel Use After Drug-Eluting Stent Implantation in Korean Patients. American Journal of Cardiology, 104(12), 1668-1673. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2009.07.049
Shin, Dong Ho ; Chae, In Ho ; Youn, Tae Jin ; Cho, Sung Il ; Kwon, Dong A. ; Suh, Jung Won ; Chang, Hyuk-Jae ; Cho, Young Seok ; Chung, Woo Young ; Choi, Young Jin ; Gwon, Hyeon Cheol ; Han, Kyoo Rok ; Choi, Dong Ju. / Reasonable Duration of Clopidogrel Use After Drug-Eluting Stent Implantation in Korean Patients. In: American Journal of Cardiology. 2009 ; Vol. 104, No. 12. pp. 1668-1673.
@article{6885520d45a94ad0a1eb3216c109f151,
title = "Reasonable Duration of Clopidogrel Use After Drug-Eluting Stent Implantation in Korean Patients",
abstract = "Current guidelines recommend that clopidogrel be given to patients for 12 months after drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation. However, the evidence is insufficient to support the benefit of long-term clopidogrel therapy, especially in Asian patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether different durations of clopidogrel use might influence long-term outcomes after DES implantation. A total of 844 patients from 4 medical centers in Korea who had undergone successful DES implantation from November 2004 to April 2006 were enrolled. Patients who were event free at 6-month follow-up were divided into 2 groups by clopidogrel use (575 users, 163 nonusers) and followed. The end point was a composite of death, myocardial infarction, and stent thrombosis. During 1,056.4 patient-years of follow-up (median 2.02), there were 7 deaths, 3 myocardial infarctions, and 2 episodes of stent thrombosis. No significant differences in the primary end point were observed between clopidogrel users and nonusers (cumulative incidence 2.9{\%} vs 2.8{\%}, p = 0.578; adjusted hazard ratio 0.67, 95{\%} confidence interval 0.16 to 2.77). In analysis with time-dependent covariates, the incidence rates of the primary end point during observation periods with and without clopidogrel were similar, although the effect estimates were broad (9.9 with and 10.6 without clopidogrel per 1,000 patient-years; adjusted hazard ratio 0.52, 95{\%} confidence interval 0.09 to 3.17). Interestingly, the effect estimates from propensity score analyses, although they also had wide confidence intervals, were closer to the null than those from conventional Cox analyses. In conclusion, this cohort of Korean patients failed to show an absolute benefit of long-term clopidogrel therapy after DES implantation. The benefit of clopidogrel use beyond 6 months after DES implantation remains uncertain, and hence the decision to use long-term dual-antiplatelet therapy should be based on the risk factors of each patient.",
author = "Shin, {Dong Ho} and Chae, {In Ho} and Youn, {Tae Jin} and Cho, {Sung Il} and Kwon, {Dong A.} and Suh, {Jung Won} and Hyuk-Jae Chang and Cho, {Young Seok} and Chung, {Woo Young} and Choi, {Young Jin} and Gwon, {Hyeon Cheol} and Han, {Kyoo Rok} and Choi, {Dong Ju}",
year = "2009",
month = "12",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.amjcard.2009.07.049",
language = "English",
volume = "104",
pages = "1668--1673",
journal = "American Journal of Cardiology",
issn = "0002-9149",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "12",

}

Shin, DH, Chae, IH, Youn, TJ, Cho, SI, Kwon, DA, Suh, JW, Chang, H-J, Cho, YS, Chung, WY, Choi, YJ, Gwon, HC, Han, KR & Choi, DJ 2009, 'Reasonable Duration of Clopidogrel Use After Drug-Eluting Stent Implantation in Korean Patients', American Journal of Cardiology, vol. 104, no. 12, pp. 1668-1673. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2009.07.049

Reasonable Duration of Clopidogrel Use After Drug-Eluting Stent Implantation in Korean Patients. / Shin, Dong Ho; Chae, In Ho; Youn, Tae Jin; Cho, Sung Il; Kwon, Dong A.; Suh, Jung Won; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Cho, Young Seok; Chung, Woo Young; Choi, Young Jin; Gwon, Hyeon Cheol; Han, Kyoo Rok; Choi, Dong Ju.

In: American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 104, No. 12, 15.12.2009, p. 1668-1673.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reasonable Duration of Clopidogrel Use After Drug-Eluting Stent Implantation in Korean Patients

AU - Shin, Dong Ho

AU - Chae, In Ho

AU - Youn, Tae Jin

AU - Cho, Sung Il

AU - Kwon, Dong A.

AU - Suh, Jung Won

AU - Chang, Hyuk-Jae

AU - Cho, Young Seok

AU - Chung, Woo Young

AU - Choi, Young Jin

AU - Gwon, Hyeon Cheol

AU - Han, Kyoo Rok

AU - Choi, Dong Ju

PY - 2009/12/15

Y1 - 2009/12/15

N2 - Current guidelines recommend that clopidogrel be given to patients for 12 months after drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation. However, the evidence is insufficient to support the benefit of long-term clopidogrel therapy, especially in Asian patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether different durations of clopidogrel use might influence long-term outcomes after DES implantation. A total of 844 patients from 4 medical centers in Korea who had undergone successful DES implantation from November 2004 to April 2006 were enrolled. Patients who were event free at 6-month follow-up were divided into 2 groups by clopidogrel use (575 users, 163 nonusers) and followed. The end point was a composite of death, myocardial infarction, and stent thrombosis. During 1,056.4 patient-years of follow-up (median 2.02), there were 7 deaths, 3 myocardial infarctions, and 2 episodes of stent thrombosis. No significant differences in the primary end point were observed between clopidogrel users and nonusers (cumulative incidence 2.9% vs 2.8%, p = 0.578; adjusted hazard ratio 0.67, 95% confidence interval 0.16 to 2.77). In analysis with time-dependent covariates, the incidence rates of the primary end point during observation periods with and without clopidogrel were similar, although the effect estimates were broad (9.9 with and 10.6 without clopidogrel per 1,000 patient-years; adjusted hazard ratio 0.52, 95% confidence interval 0.09 to 3.17). Interestingly, the effect estimates from propensity score analyses, although they also had wide confidence intervals, were closer to the null than those from conventional Cox analyses. In conclusion, this cohort of Korean patients failed to show an absolute benefit of long-term clopidogrel therapy after DES implantation. The benefit of clopidogrel use beyond 6 months after DES implantation remains uncertain, and hence the decision to use long-term dual-antiplatelet therapy should be based on the risk factors of each patient.

AB - Current guidelines recommend that clopidogrel be given to patients for 12 months after drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation. However, the evidence is insufficient to support the benefit of long-term clopidogrel therapy, especially in Asian patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether different durations of clopidogrel use might influence long-term outcomes after DES implantation. A total of 844 patients from 4 medical centers in Korea who had undergone successful DES implantation from November 2004 to April 2006 were enrolled. Patients who were event free at 6-month follow-up were divided into 2 groups by clopidogrel use (575 users, 163 nonusers) and followed. The end point was a composite of death, myocardial infarction, and stent thrombosis. During 1,056.4 patient-years of follow-up (median 2.02), there were 7 deaths, 3 myocardial infarctions, and 2 episodes of stent thrombosis. No significant differences in the primary end point were observed between clopidogrel users and nonusers (cumulative incidence 2.9% vs 2.8%, p = 0.578; adjusted hazard ratio 0.67, 95% confidence interval 0.16 to 2.77). In analysis with time-dependent covariates, the incidence rates of the primary end point during observation periods with and without clopidogrel were similar, although the effect estimates were broad (9.9 with and 10.6 without clopidogrel per 1,000 patient-years; adjusted hazard ratio 0.52, 95% confidence interval 0.09 to 3.17). Interestingly, the effect estimates from propensity score analyses, although they also had wide confidence intervals, were closer to the null than those from conventional Cox analyses. In conclusion, this cohort of Korean patients failed to show an absolute benefit of long-term clopidogrel therapy after DES implantation. The benefit of clopidogrel use beyond 6 months after DES implantation remains uncertain, and hence the decision to use long-term dual-antiplatelet therapy should be based on the risk factors of each patient.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=70949090108&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=70949090108&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.amjcard.2009.07.049

DO - 10.1016/j.amjcard.2009.07.049

M3 - Article

C2 - 19962472

AN - SCOPUS:70949090108

VL - 104

SP - 1668

EP - 1673

JO - American Journal of Cardiology

JF - American Journal of Cardiology

SN - 0002-9149

IS - 12

ER -