Reconciling state aid and property tax relief for urban Schools: Birthing a new STAR in New York state

Tae Ho Eom, Kieran M. Killeen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Similar to many property tax relief programs, New York State's School Tax Relief (STAR) program has been shown to exacerbate school resource inequities across urban, suburban, and rural schools. STAR's inherent conflict with the wealth equalization policies of New York State's school finance system are highlighted in a manner that effectively penalizes large, urban school districts by not adjusting for factors likely to contribute to high property taxation. As a policy solution, this article presents results of a simulation that distributes property tax relief using an econometrically based cost index. The results substantially favor high-need urban and rural school districts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)36-61
Number of pages26
JournalEducation and Urban Society
Volume40
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Nov 1

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tax relief
property tax
aid
relief
rural school
school
district
financial system
taxation
finance
simulation
tax
costs
resources
resource
cost

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

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Reconciling state aid and property tax relief for urban Schools : Birthing a new STAR in New York state. / Eom, Tae Ho; Killeen, Kieran M.

In: Education and Urban Society, Vol. 40, No. 1, 01.11.2007, p. 36-61.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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