Reconstruction of current density distributions in axially symmetric cylindrical sections using one component of magnetic flux density: Computer simulation study

Jin Keun Seo, Ohin Kwon, Byung Il Lee, Eung Je Woo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In magnetic resonance current density imaging (MRCDI), we inject current into a subject through surface electrodes and measure the induced magnetic flux density B inside the subject using an MRI scanner. Once we have obtained all three components of B, we can reconstruct the internal current density distribution J = ∇ × B/μ0. This technique, however, requires subject rotation since the MRI scanner can measure only one component of B that is parallel to the direction of its main magnetic field. In this paper, under the assumption that the out-of-plane current density Jz, is negligible in an imaging slice belonging to the xy-plane, we developed an imaging technique of current density distributions using only Bz, the z-component of B. The technique described in this paper does not require a subject rotation but the quality of reconstructed images depends on the amount of out-of-plane current density Jz. From numerical simulations, we found that the new algorithm could be applied to subjects such as human limbs using longitudinal electrodes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)565-577
Number of pages13
JournalPhysiological measurement
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003 May 1

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Magnetic flux
Computer Simulation
Electrodes
Current density
Computer simulation
Magnetic Fields
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Imaging techniques
Extremities
Magnetic resonance imaging
Magnetic resonance
Magnetic fields
Direction compound

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biophysics
  • Physiology
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

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abstract = "In magnetic resonance current density imaging (MRCDI), we inject current into a subject through surface electrodes and measure the induced magnetic flux density B inside the subject using an MRI scanner. Once we have obtained all three components of B, we can reconstruct the internal current density distribution J = ∇ × B/μ0. This technique, however, requires subject rotation since the MRI scanner can measure only one component of B that is parallel to the direction of its main magnetic field. In this paper, under the assumption that the out-of-plane current density Jz, is negligible in an imaging slice belonging to the xy-plane, we developed an imaging technique of current density distributions using only Bz, the z-component of B. The technique described in this paper does not require a subject rotation but the quality of reconstructed images depends on the amount of out-of-plane current density Jz. From numerical simulations, we found that the new algorithm could be applied to subjects such as human limbs using longitudinal electrodes.",
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Reconstruction of current density distributions in axially symmetric cylindrical sections using one component of magnetic flux density : Computer simulation study. / Seo, Jin Keun; Kwon, Ohin; Lee, Byung Il; Woo, Eung Je.

In: Physiological measurement, Vol. 24, No. 2, 01.05.2003, p. 565-577.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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