Redox-degradable biocompatible hyperbranched polyglycerols: Synthesis, copolymerization kinetics, degradation, and biocompatibility

Suhyun Son, Eeseul Shin, Byeong Su Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Polymers that are biocompatible and degrade in response to stimuli are highly desirable as smart drug-delivery carriers. We report the first novel redox-degradable hyperbranched polyglycerols. A glycerol monomer containing a disulfide bond, i.e., 2-((2-(oxiran-2-ylmethoxy)ethyl)disulfanyl)ethan-1-ol (SSG), was designed and polymerized through anionic ring-opening multibranching polymerization to yield a series of redox-degradable hyperbranched polyglycerols (PSSGs) with controlled molecular weights (2000-11 000 g/mol) and relatively low molecular weight distributions (Mw/Mn < 1.15). In addition, copolymerization with a nondegradable glycerol (G) monomer provided P(G-co-SSG) copolymers, which contained an adjustable fraction of degradable moieties within their polyglycerol backbones. The polymerization was characterized using 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, GPC, and MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry. The copolymerization process was also evaluated using quantitative in situ 13C NMR kinetic measurements in bulk, which revealed that the reaction kinetics of G were faster than those of the SSG monomer, leading to a gradient during the copolymerization process. Furthermore, we explored the redox-responsive degradation of the polymers upon treatment with a reducing agent, which resulted in selective degradation of the polymers in small segments. In vitro cytotoxicity studies, such as MTT and CCK-8 assays, revealed the superior biocompatibility of these new polymers even at high concentrations of 500 μg/mL. We anticipate that these novel redox-degradable and highly biocompatible polyglycerols will find applications in a variety of emerging biomedical fields.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)600-609
Number of pages10
JournalMacromolecules
Volume48
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Feb 10

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Biocompatibility
Copolymerization
Polymers
Degradation
Kinetics
Monomers
Glycerol
Sincalide
Anionic polymerization
Reducing Agents
Ring opening polymerization
Reducing agents
Molecular weight distribution
Cytotoxicity
Drug delivery
Reaction kinetics
Disulfides
Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy
Mass spectrometry
Assays

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Organic Chemistry
  • Polymers and Plastics
  • Inorganic Chemistry
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

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abstract = "Polymers that are biocompatible and degrade in response to stimuli are highly desirable as smart drug-delivery carriers. We report the first novel redox-degradable hyperbranched polyglycerols. A glycerol monomer containing a disulfide bond, i.e., 2-((2-(oxiran-2-ylmethoxy)ethyl)disulfanyl)ethan-1-ol (SSG), was designed and polymerized through anionic ring-opening multibranching polymerization to yield a series of redox-degradable hyperbranched polyglycerols (PSSGs) with controlled molecular weights (2000-11 000 g/mol) and relatively low molecular weight distributions (Mw/Mn < 1.15). In addition, copolymerization with a nondegradable glycerol (G) monomer provided P(G-co-SSG) copolymers, which contained an adjustable fraction of degradable moieties within their polyglycerol backbones. The polymerization was characterized using 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, GPC, and MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry. The copolymerization process was also evaluated using quantitative in situ 13C NMR kinetic measurements in bulk, which revealed that the reaction kinetics of G were faster than those of the SSG monomer, leading to a gradient during the copolymerization process. Furthermore, we explored the redox-responsive degradation of the polymers upon treatment with a reducing agent, which resulted in selective degradation of the polymers in small segments. In vitro cytotoxicity studies, such as MTT and CCK-8 assays, revealed the superior biocompatibility of these new polymers even at high concentrations of 500 μg/mL. We anticipate that these novel redox-degradable and highly biocompatible polyglycerols will find applications in a variety of emerging biomedical fields.",
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Redox-degradable biocompatible hyperbranched polyglycerols : Synthesis, copolymerization kinetics, degradation, and biocompatibility. / Son, Suhyun; Shin, Eeseul; Kim, Byeong Su.

In: Macromolecules, Vol. 48, No. 3, 10.02.2015, p. 600-609.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Polymers that are biocompatible and degrade in response to stimuli are highly desirable as smart drug-delivery carriers. We report the first novel redox-degradable hyperbranched polyglycerols. A glycerol monomer containing a disulfide bond, i.e., 2-((2-(oxiran-2-ylmethoxy)ethyl)disulfanyl)ethan-1-ol (SSG), was designed and polymerized through anionic ring-opening multibranching polymerization to yield a series of redox-degradable hyperbranched polyglycerols (PSSGs) with controlled molecular weights (2000-11 000 g/mol) and relatively low molecular weight distributions (Mw/Mn < 1.15). In addition, copolymerization with a nondegradable glycerol (G) monomer provided P(G-co-SSG) copolymers, which contained an adjustable fraction of degradable moieties within their polyglycerol backbones. The polymerization was characterized using 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, GPC, and MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry. The copolymerization process was also evaluated using quantitative in situ 13C NMR kinetic measurements in bulk, which revealed that the reaction kinetics of G were faster than those of the SSG monomer, leading to a gradient during the copolymerization process. Furthermore, we explored the redox-responsive degradation of the polymers upon treatment with a reducing agent, which resulted in selective degradation of the polymers in small segments. In vitro cytotoxicity studies, such as MTT and CCK-8 assays, revealed the superior biocompatibility of these new polymers even at high concentrations of 500 μg/mL. We anticipate that these novel redox-degradable and highly biocompatible polyglycerols will find applications in a variety of emerging biomedical fields.

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