Reduction of Slit Diaphragm-associated Molecules by Sirolimus: Is it Enough to Induce Proteinuria?

B. S. Kim, J. G. Lee, Y. Cho, S. H. Song, K. H. Huh, M. S. Kim, Y. S. Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Sirolimus (SRL), a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor, is widely used in transplantation, but the mechanisms whereby it induces adverse effects, such as proteinuria and edema, remain unclear. To determine whether isolated SRL induces proteinuria or not, the authors intraperitoneally injected C57BL/6 mice with different doses of SRL (0 mg/[kg·d], 3 mg/[kg·d], 10 mg/[kg·d], or 30 mg/[kg·d]) for 24 days. Urinary albumin excretion was then quantified using a double-sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and serum creatinine levels were measured using a single dry-film chemistry auto-analyzer. The mRNA expression levels of various genes were also measured by polymerase chain reaction. Urinary albumin was not detected in the SRL-treated mice, but serum creatinine levels were found to increase dose-dependently and were significantly higher in the animals treated with 30 mg/kg of SRL than in untreated controls. Glomerular mRNA expression profiling showed down-regulations of podocyte-related genes (Wilms tumor 1, synaptopodin, nephrin, CD2-associated protein, and podocin) and of transforming growth factor-beta (a marker of fibrosis) in sirolimus-treated mice. In addition, expressions of the antiapoptotic genes Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL were also down-regulated. Furthermore, the protein levels of these genes in mice kidney were also decreased by sirolimus. Although sirolimus treatment reduced the expressions of slit diaphragm–associated molecules and increased serum creatinine levels, it failed to induce proteinuria. Our findings indicate that proteinuria is not induced by isolated SRL treatment. Further studies are required to identify conditions in which sirolimus induces proteinuria.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1165-1169
Number of pages5
JournalTransplantation Proceedings
Volume49
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jun

Fingerprint

Sirolimus
Diaphragm
Proteinuria
Creatinine
Albumins
Serum
bcl-2 Genes
Podocytes
Messenger RNA
Wilms Tumor
Inbred C57BL Mouse
Transforming Growth Factor beta
Genes
Edema
Fibrosis
Down-Regulation
Transplantation
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Kidney
Polymerase Chain Reaction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Kim, B. S. ; Lee, J. G. ; Cho, Y. ; Song, S. H. ; Huh, K. H. ; Kim, M. S. ; Kim, Y. S. / Reduction of Slit Diaphragm-associated Molecules by Sirolimus : Is it Enough to Induce Proteinuria?. In: Transplantation Proceedings. 2017 ; Vol. 49, No. 5. pp. 1165-1169.
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Reduction of Slit Diaphragm-associated Molecules by Sirolimus : Is it Enough to Induce Proteinuria? / Kim, B. S.; Lee, J. G.; Cho, Y.; Song, S. H.; Huh, K. H.; Kim, M. S.; Kim, Y. S.

In: Transplantation Proceedings, Vol. 49, No. 5, 06.2017, p. 1165-1169.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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