Relationship between microsatellite instability and histologic types of colorectal carcinoma

Zhe Piao, Jongsun Kim, Nam Kyu Kim, Sung Hoon Noh, Jae Y. Ro, Hoguen Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To evaluate the relationship between microsatellite instability (MIN) and histologic types of carcinomas in different organs, we analyzed how often MIN occurred in signet ring cell carcinomas of the colon (7 cases), stomach (13 cases), urinary bladder (5 cases), and prostate (3 cases). We also analyzed MIN and the expression of Epstein-Bart virus encoded RNA (EBER) transcripts in undifferentiated carcinoma with lymphoid stroma: 18 cases of lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma (LELC) of the colorectum and 8 of the stomach and 9 cases of lymphoepithelial nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). MIN was frequently observed in the signet ring cell carcinomas (4/7, 57%) and LELCs (12/18, 67%) of the colorectum, but was not found in the signet ring cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder or prostate or in NPCs and occurred significantly (p<0.05) less often in both gastric signet ring cell carcinoma (1/13, 8%) and gastric LELCs (1/8, 13%). Most of the gastric LELCs (5/6) and all of the NPCs in which MIN was not identified expressed EBER transcripts. Thus, MIN appear to be specific for signet ring cell carcinomas and LELCs of the colorectum, but there was no strong correlation between MIN and carcinomas in other organs. Different genetic alterations in the different organs could result in the formation of carcinomas of similar types.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)791-794
Number of pages4
JournalOncology reports
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1997 Jan 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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