Relationship of social support and decisional conflict to advance directives attitude in Korean older adults: A community-based cross-sectional study

Juhee Lee, Dukyoo Jung, Moonki Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between social support, decisional conflict, and attitude towards advance directives, and determine whether decisional conflict mediates the relation between social support and advance directives attitude among older adults in South Korea. Methods: In total, 209 community-based older adults (mean age, 74.82 years) participated in this cross-sectional study. Demographic characteristics, self-perceived health status, social support, decisional conflict, and advance directives attitude were investigated via a structured questionnaire. Data analysis was carried out using Pearson's correlation and path analyses. Results: The mean score of advance directives attitude was 48.01 (range, 35-61). Decisional conflict and social support were both significantly related to advance directives attitude (P<0.001). Additionally, decisional conflict was a mediator between social support and advance directives attitudes. Conclusion: The results confirmed the importance of social support for reducing decisional conflict and encouraging positive attitudes toward advance directives. Future studies are needed to support the development of culturally sensitive educational approaches regarding advance directives for older adults in Korea.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)29-37
Number of pages9
JournalJapan Journal of Nursing Science
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Jan 1

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Research and Theory

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