Relationships between body image, body mass index, and smoking in Korean adolescents

Results of a nationwide Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey

Woo Taek Lee, Hye In Kim, Jee Hoon Kim, Seok Jin R. Lee, Seri Hong, Euncheol Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study assessed the association between subjective body image or objective body mass index (BMI) and the risk of daily smoking in Korean adolescents, with a purpose of identifying the most suitable models. Materials and Methods: Using the 2013 9th Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey data for 72,435 students, odds ratios were calculated for daily smoking in the past month, according to the subjective body image and calculated BMI using a respective multiple logistic regression model. The combined effect of these two factors was also analyzed by pairing a BMI category with a subjective body image category, using odds ratios for the same event within each sex group. Results: Among the surveyed students, 7.2% of boys and 1.8% of girls were classified as daily smokers. Students who perceived themselves as being very obese tended to be at lower risk of daily smoking (OR=0.61 in boys with 95% CI=0.47 to 0.79; OR=0.66 in women with 95% CI=0.47 to 0.93). In addition, boys within the obese or overweight BMI category showed a lower risk of daily smoking (OR=0.86, 95% CI: 0.77-0.96). Lean BMI was significantly associated with higher odds ratios for daily smoking only in female students (OR=1.24, 95% CI: 1.02-1.52). When pairing these two objective and subjective factors, results suggested that subjective body image has a greater effect on daily smoking than BMI in both boys and girls. Conclusions: In both male and female students, subjective body image had a greater effect on daily smoking than body mass index. A model using the combination of BMI and subjective body image was the best fit in girls, in contrast to the model using subjective body image only best suitable in boys, for the prediction of daily smoking. These results including several factors associated with daily smoking in Korean students, provide useful data for the development and implementation of smoking intervention and cessation programs for adolescents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6273-6278
Number of pages6
JournalAsian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
Volume16
Issue number15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Body Image
Korea
Risk-Taking
Body Mass Index
Smoking
Students
Odds Ratio
Logistic Models
Surveys and Questionnaires
Smoking Cessation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

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title = "Relationships between body image, body mass index, and smoking in Korean adolescents: Results of a nationwide Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey",
abstract = "Objective: This study assessed the association between subjective body image or objective body mass index (BMI) and the risk of daily smoking in Korean adolescents, with a purpose of identifying the most suitable models. Materials and Methods: Using the 2013 9th Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey data for 72,435 students, odds ratios were calculated for daily smoking in the past month, according to the subjective body image and calculated BMI using a respective multiple logistic regression model. The combined effect of these two factors was also analyzed by pairing a BMI category with a subjective body image category, using odds ratios for the same event within each sex group. Results: Among the surveyed students, 7.2{\%} of boys and 1.8{\%} of girls were classified as daily smokers. Students who perceived themselves as being very obese tended to be at lower risk of daily smoking (OR=0.61 in boys with 95{\%} CI=0.47 to 0.79; OR=0.66 in women with 95{\%} CI=0.47 to 0.93). In addition, boys within the obese or overweight BMI category showed a lower risk of daily smoking (OR=0.86, 95{\%} CI: 0.77-0.96). Lean BMI was significantly associated with higher odds ratios for daily smoking only in female students (OR=1.24, 95{\%} CI: 1.02-1.52). When pairing these two objective and subjective factors, results suggested that subjective body image has a greater effect on daily smoking than BMI in both boys and girls. Conclusions: In both male and female students, subjective body image had a greater effect on daily smoking than body mass index. A model using the combination of BMI and subjective body image was the best fit in girls, in contrast to the model using subjective body image only best suitable in boys, for the prediction of daily smoking. These results including several factors associated with daily smoking in Korean students, provide useful data for the development and implementation of smoking intervention and cessation programs for adolescents.",
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Relationships between body image, body mass index, and smoking in Korean adolescents : Results of a nationwide Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey. / Lee, Woo Taek; Kim, Hye In; Kim, Jee Hoon; Lee, Seok Jin R.; Hong, Seri; Park, Euncheol.

In: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, Vol. 16, No. 15, 01.01.2015, p. 6273-6278.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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