Religion for naturalists

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Some naturalists feel an affinity with some religions, or with a particular religion. They may have previously belonged to it, and/or been raised in it, and/or be close to people who belong to it, and/or simply feel attracted to its practices, texts and traditions. This raises the question of whether and to what extent a naturalist can lead the life of a religious believer. The sparse literature on this topic focuses on (a position recognizable as) religious fictionalism. I also frame the debate in these terms. I ask what religious fictionalism might amount to, reject some possible versions of it and endorse a different one. I then examine the existing proposals, by Robin Le Poidevin, Peter Lipton, Andrew Eshleman and Howard Wettstein, and show that even on my version of religious fictionalism, much of what has been described by these authors is still possible.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)195-214
Number of pages20
JournalInternational Journal for Philosophy of Religion
Volume78
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Oct 24

Fingerprint

Naturalists
Religion
Fictionalism
Believer
Affinity
Peter Lipton

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Philosophy

Cite this

@article{1b981ce6081d496db4d89a0a35a4dce8,
title = "Religion for naturalists",
abstract = "Some naturalists feel an affinity with some religions, or with a particular religion. They may have previously belonged to it, and/or been raised in it, and/or be close to people who belong to it, and/or simply feel attracted to its practices, texts and traditions. This raises the question of whether and to what extent a naturalist can lead the life of a religious believer. The sparse literature on this topic focuses on (a position recognizable as) religious fictionalism. I also frame the debate in these terms. I ask what religious fictionalism might amount to, reject some possible versions of it and endorse a different one. I then examine the existing proposals, by Robin Le Poidevin, Peter Lipton, Andrew Eshleman and Howard Wettstein, and show that even on my version of religious fictionalism, much of what has been described by these authors is still possible.",
author = "Natalja Deng",
year = "2015",
month = "10",
day = "24",
doi = "10.1007/s11153-015-9529-y",
language = "English",
volume = "78",
pages = "195--214",
journal = "International Journal for Philosophy of Religion",
issn = "0020-7047",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "2",

}

Religion for naturalists. / Deng, Natalja.

In: International Journal for Philosophy of Religion, Vol. 78, No. 2, 24.10.2015, p. 195-214.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Religion for naturalists

AU - Deng, Natalja

PY - 2015/10/24

Y1 - 2015/10/24

N2 - Some naturalists feel an affinity with some religions, or with a particular religion. They may have previously belonged to it, and/or been raised in it, and/or be close to people who belong to it, and/or simply feel attracted to its practices, texts and traditions. This raises the question of whether and to what extent a naturalist can lead the life of a religious believer. The sparse literature on this topic focuses on (a position recognizable as) religious fictionalism. I also frame the debate in these terms. I ask what religious fictionalism might amount to, reject some possible versions of it and endorse a different one. I then examine the existing proposals, by Robin Le Poidevin, Peter Lipton, Andrew Eshleman and Howard Wettstein, and show that even on my version of religious fictionalism, much of what has been described by these authors is still possible.

AB - Some naturalists feel an affinity with some religions, or with a particular religion. They may have previously belonged to it, and/or been raised in it, and/or be close to people who belong to it, and/or simply feel attracted to its practices, texts and traditions. This raises the question of whether and to what extent a naturalist can lead the life of a religious believer. The sparse literature on this topic focuses on (a position recognizable as) religious fictionalism. I also frame the debate in these terms. I ask what religious fictionalism might amount to, reject some possible versions of it and endorse a different one. I then examine the existing proposals, by Robin Le Poidevin, Peter Lipton, Andrew Eshleman and Howard Wettstein, and show that even on my version of religious fictionalism, much of what has been described by these authors is still possible.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84942193816&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84942193816&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11153-015-9529-y

DO - 10.1007/s11153-015-9529-y

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84942193816

VL - 78

SP - 195

EP - 214

JO - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion

JF - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion

SN - 0020-7047

IS - 2

ER -