Removal of submicron particles using a carbon fiber ionizer-assisted medium air filter in a heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system

Jae Hong Park, Ki Young Yoon, Jungho Hwang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Laboratory tests of particle removal were performed with a pair of carbon fiber ionizers installed upstream of a glass fiber air filter. For air flow face velocities of 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 m/s, the overall particle removal efficiencies of the filter for all submicron particles were 17%, 16%, and 14%, respectively, when the ionizers were not turned on. These values increased to 27%, 23%, and 19%, respectively, when the ionizers were used to generate ions of 6.0 × 109 ions/cm3 in concentration. The carbon fiber ionizers were then installed in front of a glass fiber air filter located in a heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system. Field tests were performed in a test office room with a total indoor particle concentration of 2.2 × 104 particles/cm3. When the flow rate was 75 cubic meters per hour (CMH), the steady-state values of the total indoor particle concentrations using the glass fiber air filter with and without ionizers decreased to 0.87 × 104 particles/cm3 and 1.15 × 104 particles/cm3, respectively, resulting in a 25% decrease of the ionizer effect. When the operation flow rate was increased to 115 and 150 CMH, the effect of the ionizer decreased to 19% and 17%, respectively. These experimental data match the results calculated using a mass-balance model whose parameters were determined from laboratory tests.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1699-1708
Number of pages10
JournalBuilding and Environment
Volume46
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Aug 1

Fingerprint

Air filters
air conditioning
heat pump
conditioning
Air conditioning
Glass fibers
Ventilation
Carbon fibers
ventilation
air
filter
heating
Heating
Flow rate
Ions
glass
Values
Air
removal
particle

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction

Cite this

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title = "Removal of submicron particles using a carbon fiber ionizer-assisted medium air filter in a heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system",
abstract = "Laboratory tests of particle removal were performed with a pair of carbon fiber ionizers installed upstream of a glass fiber air filter. For air flow face velocities of 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 m/s, the overall particle removal efficiencies of the filter for all submicron particles were 17{\%}, 16{\%}, and 14{\%}, respectively, when the ionizers were not turned on. These values increased to 27{\%}, 23{\%}, and 19{\%}, respectively, when the ionizers were used to generate ions of 6.0 × 109 ions/cm3 in concentration. The carbon fiber ionizers were then installed in front of a glass fiber air filter located in a heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system. Field tests were performed in a test office room with a total indoor particle concentration of 2.2 × 104 particles/cm3. When the flow rate was 75 cubic meters per hour (CMH), the steady-state values of the total indoor particle concentrations using the glass fiber air filter with and without ionizers decreased to 0.87 × 104 particles/cm3 and 1.15 × 104 particles/cm3, respectively, resulting in a 25{\%} decrease of the ionizer effect. When the operation flow rate was increased to 115 and 150 CMH, the effect of the ionizer decreased to 19{\%} and 17{\%}, respectively. These experimental data match the results calculated using a mass-balance model whose parameters were determined from laboratory tests.",
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Removal of submicron particles using a carbon fiber ionizer-assisted medium air filter in a heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system. / Park, Jae Hong; Yoon, Ki Young; Hwang, Jungho.

In: Building and Environment, Vol. 46, No. 8, 01.08.2011, p. 1699-1708.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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