Repetitive involuntary leg movements in patients with brainstem lesions involving the pontine tegmentum

Evidence for a pontine inhibitory region in humans

philhyu Lee, Jin Soo Lee, Seok Woo Yong, Kyoon Huh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Repetitive involuntary limbs movements have been mostly reported in patients with extensive brainstem pathologies, but the region responsible is unknown. We describe two patients with progressive basilar artery infarcts who showed automatic stepping and one patient with an osmotic demyelination disorder who showed periodic involuntary leg movements. By subtracting diffusion-weighted images before and after the development of repetitive involuntary leg movements, the brainstem lesion responsible for the involuntary movements was distinctively located in the vicinity of the pontine tegmentum, which is known as the pontine inhibitory region in animal studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)105-110
Number of pages6
JournalParkinsonism and Related Disorders
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Dyskinesias
Brain Stem
Leg
Basilar Artery
Demyelinating Diseases
Extremities
Pathology
Pontine Tegmentum

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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Repetitive involuntary leg movements in patients with brainstem lesions involving the pontine tegmentum : Evidence for a pontine inhibitory region in humans. / Lee, philhyu; Lee, Jin Soo; Yong, Seok Woo; Huh, Kyoon.

In: Parkinsonism and Related Disorders, Vol. 11, No. 2, 01.01.2005, p. 105-110.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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