Responsibility and risk: Accounts of reasons for seeking an HIV test

Seung-Hee Lee, Nicolas Sheon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using data from recordings of HIV test counselling sessions in publicly funded sites in Northern California, US, this paper examines the discussion of clients' reasons for testing as a site for self-presentation. While counsellors attempt to use the reason for testing discussion as a lead-in to a discussion of risk behaviour, clients often describe their testing as part of a routine, not in response to a specific risk. Clients use three practices to present themselves as reasonable and responsible people who are in control of their HIV status. First, clients present the normal and routine nature of testing, thereby portraying their reasonableness in seeking an HIV test. Secondly, clients deny or downgrade their risk when counsellors seek to identify a specific risk. Thirdly, when introducing a particular risk, clients package it within mitigating contexts that emphasise their knowledge about and control over the risk. These practices can make it difficult for counsellors to focus the counselling session on a specific risk incident. One of the counsellors in our dataset provides an alternative approach that manages to elicit risk and legitimates routine testing as a reason for testing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)167-181
Number of pages15
JournalSociology of Health and Illness
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Mar 1

Fingerprint

HIV
responsibility
counselor
counseling session
Counseling
reasonableness
self-presentation
Risk-Taking
risk behavior
recording
incident
Counselors

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{3ae1f443772c4712a584fe9947415bda,
title = "Responsibility and risk: Accounts of reasons for seeking an HIV test",
abstract = "Using data from recordings of HIV test counselling sessions in publicly funded sites in Northern California, US, this paper examines the discussion of clients' reasons for testing as a site for self-presentation. While counsellors attempt to use the reason for testing discussion as a lead-in to a discussion of risk behaviour, clients often describe their testing as part of a routine, not in response to a specific risk. Clients use three practices to present themselves as reasonable and responsible people who are in control of their HIV status. First, clients present the normal and routine nature of testing, thereby portraying their reasonableness in seeking an HIV test. Secondly, clients deny or downgrade their risk when counsellors seek to identify a specific risk. Thirdly, when introducing a particular risk, clients package it within mitigating contexts that emphasise their knowledge about and control over the risk. These practices can make it difficult for counsellors to focus the counselling session on a specific risk incident. One of the counsellors in our dataset provides an alternative approach that manages to elicit risk and legitimates routine testing as a reason for testing.",
author = "Seung-Hee Lee and Nicolas Sheon",
year = "2008",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1467-9566.2007.01038.x",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "167--181",
journal = "Sociology of Health and Illness",
issn = "0141-9889",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

Responsibility and risk : Accounts of reasons for seeking an HIV test. / Lee, Seung-Hee; Sheon, Nicolas.

In: Sociology of Health and Illness, Vol. 30, No. 2, 01.03.2008, p. 167-181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Responsibility and risk

T2 - Accounts of reasons for seeking an HIV test

AU - Lee, Seung-Hee

AU - Sheon, Nicolas

PY - 2008/3/1

Y1 - 2008/3/1

N2 - Using data from recordings of HIV test counselling sessions in publicly funded sites in Northern California, US, this paper examines the discussion of clients' reasons for testing as a site for self-presentation. While counsellors attempt to use the reason for testing discussion as a lead-in to a discussion of risk behaviour, clients often describe their testing as part of a routine, not in response to a specific risk. Clients use three practices to present themselves as reasonable and responsible people who are in control of their HIV status. First, clients present the normal and routine nature of testing, thereby portraying their reasonableness in seeking an HIV test. Secondly, clients deny or downgrade their risk when counsellors seek to identify a specific risk. Thirdly, when introducing a particular risk, clients package it within mitigating contexts that emphasise their knowledge about and control over the risk. These practices can make it difficult for counsellors to focus the counselling session on a specific risk incident. One of the counsellors in our dataset provides an alternative approach that manages to elicit risk and legitimates routine testing as a reason for testing.

AB - Using data from recordings of HIV test counselling sessions in publicly funded sites in Northern California, US, this paper examines the discussion of clients' reasons for testing as a site for self-presentation. While counsellors attempt to use the reason for testing discussion as a lead-in to a discussion of risk behaviour, clients often describe their testing as part of a routine, not in response to a specific risk. Clients use three practices to present themselves as reasonable and responsible people who are in control of their HIV status. First, clients present the normal and routine nature of testing, thereby portraying their reasonableness in seeking an HIV test. Secondly, clients deny or downgrade their risk when counsellors seek to identify a specific risk. Thirdly, when introducing a particular risk, clients package it within mitigating contexts that emphasise their knowledge about and control over the risk. These practices can make it difficult for counsellors to focus the counselling session on a specific risk incident. One of the counsellors in our dataset provides an alternative approach that manages to elicit risk and legitimates routine testing as a reason for testing.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=39449130723&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=39449130723&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1467-9566.2007.01038.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1467-9566.2007.01038.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 18290930

AN - SCOPUS:39449130723

VL - 30

SP - 167

EP - 181

JO - Sociology of Health and Illness

JF - Sociology of Health and Illness

SN - 0141-9889

IS - 2

ER -