Results from the ARTEMIS DISK global antifungal surveillance study

A 6.5-year analysis of susceptibilities of candida and other yeast species to fluconazole and voriconazole by standardized disk diffusion testing

Global Antifungal Surveillance Group

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164 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fluconazole in vitro susceptibility test results for 140,767 yeasts were collected from 127 participating investigators in 39 countries from June 1997 through December 2003. Data were collected on 79,343 yeast isolates tested with voriconazole from 2001 through 2003. All investigators tested clinical yeast isolates by the CLSI (formerly NCCLS) M44-A disk diffusion method. Test plates were automatically read and results were recorded with the BIOMIC Vision Image Analysis System. Species, drug, zone diameter, susceptibility category, and quality control results were collected quarterly via e-mail for analysis. Duplicate (the same patient, same species, and same susceptible-resistant biotype profile during any 7-day period) and uncontrolled test results were not analyzed. The 10 most common species of yeasts all showed less resistance to voriconazole than to fluconazole. Candida krusei showed the largest difference, with over 70% resistance to fluconazole and less than 8% to voriconazole. All species of yeasts tested were more susceptible to voriconazole than to fluconazole, assuming proposed interpretive breakpoints of ≥17 mm (susceptible) and ≤13 mm (resistant) for voriconazole. MICs reported in this study were determined from the zone diameter in millimeters from the continuous agar gradient around each disk, which was calibrated with MICs determined from the standard CLSI M27-A2 broth dilution method by balanced-weight regression analysis. The results from this investigation demonstrate the broad spectrum of the azoles for most of the opportunistic yeast pathogens but also highlight several areas where resistance may be progressing and/or where previously rare species may be "emerging".

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5848-5859
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Clinical Microbiology
Volume43
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Dec 1

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Fluconazole
Candida
Yeasts
Research Personnel
Azoles
Postal Service
varespladib methyl
Quality Control
Agar
Voriconazole
Regression Analysis
Weights and Measures
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

@article{b2ee54638982482e9bda35eb7c991d08,
title = "Results from the ARTEMIS DISK global antifungal surveillance study: A 6.5-year analysis of susceptibilities of candida and other yeast species to fluconazole and voriconazole by standardized disk diffusion testing",
abstract = "Fluconazole in vitro susceptibility test results for 140,767 yeasts were collected from 127 participating investigators in 39 countries from June 1997 through December 2003. Data were collected on 79,343 yeast isolates tested with voriconazole from 2001 through 2003. All investigators tested clinical yeast isolates by the CLSI (formerly NCCLS) M44-A disk diffusion method. Test plates were automatically read and results were recorded with the BIOMIC Vision Image Analysis System. Species, drug, zone diameter, susceptibility category, and quality control results were collected quarterly via e-mail for analysis. Duplicate (the same patient, same species, and same susceptible-resistant biotype profile during any 7-day period) and uncontrolled test results were not analyzed. The 10 most common species of yeasts all showed less resistance to voriconazole than to fluconazole. Candida krusei showed the largest difference, with over 70{\%} resistance to fluconazole and less than 8{\%} to voriconazole. All species of yeasts tested were more susceptible to voriconazole than to fluconazole, assuming proposed interpretive breakpoints of ≥17 mm (susceptible) and ≤13 mm (resistant) for voriconazole. MICs reported in this study were determined from the zone diameter in millimeters from the continuous agar gradient around each disk, which was calibrated with MICs determined from the standard CLSI M27-A2 broth dilution method by balanced-weight regression analysis. The results from this investigation demonstrate the broad spectrum of the azoles for most of the opportunistic yeast pathogens but also highlight several areas where resistance may be progressing and/or where previously rare species may be {"}emerging{"}.",
author = "{Global Antifungal Surveillance Group} and Pfaller, {M. A.} and Diekema, {D. J.} and Rinaldi, {M. G.} and R. Barnes and B. Hu and Veselov, {A. V.} and N. Tiraboschi and E. Nagy and Gibbs, {D. L.} and Jorge Finquelievich and David Ellis and Dominique Frameree and {Van Den Abeele}, Annemarie and Senterre, {Jean Marc} and Arnaldo Colombo and Robert Rennie and Steve Sanche and Bijie Hu and Yingchun Xu and Yingyuan Zhang and Zhong, {Nan Shan} and Pilar Rivas and Angela Restrepo and Catalina Bedout and Mendez, {Ricardo Vega Matilde} and Nada Mallatova and Eva Chmelarova and Julio Ayabaca and Jeannete Zurita and M. Mallie and E. Candolfi and W. Fegeler and A. Haase and G. Rodloff and W. Bar and V. Czaika and George Petrikos and Erzs{\'e}bet Pusk{\'a}s and Ilona Doczi and Mestyan Gyula and Radka Nikolova and Uma Banerjee and Nathan Keller and Vivian Tullio and Schito, {Gian Carlo} and Giacomo Fortina and Testore, {Gian Piero} and Domenico D'Antonio and Giorgio Scalise and Kyungwon Lee",
year = "2005",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1128/JCM.43.12.5848-5859.2005",
language = "English",
volume = "43",
pages = "5848--5859",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Microbiology",
issn = "0095-1137",
publisher = "American Society for Microbiology",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Results from the ARTEMIS DISK global antifungal surveillance study

T2 - A 6.5-year analysis of susceptibilities of candida and other yeast species to fluconazole and voriconazole by standardized disk diffusion testing

AU - Global Antifungal Surveillance Group

AU - Pfaller, M. A.

AU - Diekema, D. J.

AU - Rinaldi, M. G.

AU - Barnes, R.

AU - Hu, B.

AU - Veselov, A. V.

AU - Tiraboschi, N.

AU - Nagy, E.

AU - Gibbs, D. L.

AU - Finquelievich, Jorge

AU - Ellis, David

AU - Frameree, Dominique

AU - Van Den Abeele, Annemarie

AU - Senterre, Jean Marc

AU - Colombo, Arnaldo

AU - Rennie, Robert

AU - Sanche, Steve

AU - Hu, Bijie

AU - Xu, Yingchun

AU - Zhang, Yingyuan

AU - Zhong, Nan Shan

AU - Rivas, Pilar

AU - Restrepo, Angela

AU - Bedout, Catalina

AU - Mendez, Ricardo Vega Matilde

AU - Mallatova, Nada

AU - Chmelarova, Eva

AU - Ayabaca, Julio

AU - Zurita, Jeannete

AU - Mallie, M.

AU - Candolfi, E.

AU - Fegeler, W.

AU - Haase, A.

AU - Rodloff, G.

AU - Bar, W.

AU - Czaika, V.

AU - Petrikos, George

AU - Puskás, Erzsébet

AU - Doczi, Ilona

AU - Gyula, Mestyan

AU - Nikolova, Radka

AU - Banerjee, Uma

AU - Keller, Nathan

AU - Tullio, Vivian

AU - Schito, Gian Carlo

AU - Fortina, Giacomo

AU - Testore, Gian Piero

AU - D'Antonio, Domenico

AU - Scalise, Giorgio

AU - Lee, Kyungwon

PY - 2005/12/1

Y1 - 2005/12/1

N2 - Fluconazole in vitro susceptibility test results for 140,767 yeasts were collected from 127 participating investigators in 39 countries from June 1997 through December 2003. Data were collected on 79,343 yeast isolates tested with voriconazole from 2001 through 2003. All investigators tested clinical yeast isolates by the CLSI (formerly NCCLS) M44-A disk diffusion method. Test plates were automatically read and results were recorded with the BIOMIC Vision Image Analysis System. Species, drug, zone diameter, susceptibility category, and quality control results were collected quarterly via e-mail for analysis. Duplicate (the same patient, same species, and same susceptible-resistant biotype profile during any 7-day period) and uncontrolled test results were not analyzed. The 10 most common species of yeasts all showed less resistance to voriconazole than to fluconazole. Candida krusei showed the largest difference, with over 70% resistance to fluconazole and less than 8% to voriconazole. All species of yeasts tested were more susceptible to voriconazole than to fluconazole, assuming proposed interpretive breakpoints of ≥17 mm (susceptible) and ≤13 mm (resistant) for voriconazole. MICs reported in this study were determined from the zone diameter in millimeters from the continuous agar gradient around each disk, which was calibrated with MICs determined from the standard CLSI M27-A2 broth dilution method by balanced-weight regression analysis. The results from this investigation demonstrate the broad spectrum of the azoles for most of the opportunistic yeast pathogens but also highlight several areas where resistance may be progressing and/or where previously rare species may be "emerging".

AB - Fluconazole in vitro susceptibility test results for 140,767 yeasts were collected from 127 participating investigators in 39 countries from June 1997 through December 2003. Data were collected on 79,343 yeast isolates tested with voriconazole from 2001 through 2003. All investigators tested clinical yeast isolates by the CLSI (formerly NCCLS) M44-A disk diffusion method. Test plates were automatically read and results were recorded with the BIOMIC Vision Image Analysis System. Species, drug, zone diameter, susceptibility category, and quality control results were collected quarterly via e-mail for analysis. Duplicate (the same patient, same species, and same susceptible-resistant biotype profile during any 7-day period) and uncontrolled test results were not analyzed. The 10 most common species of yeasts all showed less resistance to voriconazole than to fluconazole. Candida krusei showed the largest difference, with over 70% resistance to fluconazole and less than 8% to voriconazole. All species of yeasts tested were more susceptible to voriconazole than to fluconazole, assuming proposed interpretive breakpoints of ≥17 mm (susceptible) and ≤13 mm (resistant) for voriconazole. MICs reported in this study were determined from the zone diameter in millimeters from the continuous agar gradient around each disk, which was calibrated with MICs determined from the standard CLSI M27-A2 broth dilution method by balanced-weight regression analysis. The results from this investigation demonstrate the broad spectrum of the azoles for most of the opportunistic yeast pathogens but also highlight several areas where resistance may be progressing and/or where previously rare species may be "emerging".

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U2 - 10.1128/JCM.43.12.5848-5859.2005

DO - 10.1128/JCM.43.12.5848-5859.2005

M3 - Article

VL - 43

SP - 5848

EP - 5859

JO - Journal of Clinical Microbiology

JF - Journal of Clinical Microbiology

SN - 0095-1137

IS - 12

ER -