RSL class II transcription factors guide the nuclear localization of RHL1 to regulate root hair development 1[OPEN]

Sunok Moon, Lae Hyeon Cho, Yu Jin Kim, Yun Shil Gho, Ho Young Jeong, Woo Jong Hong, Chanhui Lee, Hyon Park, Nam Soo Jwa, Sarmina Dangol, Yafei Chen, Hayeong Park, Hyun Soo Cho, Gynheung An, Ki Hong Jung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Root hairs are important for absorption of nutrients and water from the rhizosphere. The Root Hair Defective-Six Like (RSL) Class II family of transcription factors is expressed preferentially in root hairs and has a conserved role in root hair development in land plants. We functionally characterized the seven members of the RSL Class II subfamily in the rice (Oryza sativa) genome. In root hairs, six of these genes were preferentially expressed and four were strongly expressed. Phenotypic analysis of each mutant revealed that Os07g39940 plays a major role in root hair formation, based on observations of a short root hair phenotype in those mutants. Overexpression (OX) for each of four family members in rice resulted in an increase in the density and length of root hairs. These four members contain a transcription activation domain and are targeted to the nucleus. They interact with rice Root Hairless1 (OsRHL1), a key regulator of root hair development. When heterologously expressed in epidermal cells of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, OsRHL1 was predominantly localized to the cytoplasm. When coexpressed with each of the four RSL Class II members, however, OsRLH1 was translocated to the nucleus. Transcriptome analysis using Os07g39940-OX plants revealed that 86 genes, including Class III peroxidases, were highly up-regulated. Furthermore, reactive oxygen species levels in the root hairs were increased in Os07g39940-OX plants but were drastically reduced in the os07g39940 and rhl1 mutants. Our results demonstrate that RSL Class II members function as essential regulators of root hair development in rice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)558-568
Number of pages11
JournalPlant physiology
Volume179
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Feb

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
1This work was supported by the Rural Development Administration Next-Generation BioGreen 21 Program (grants PJ01325901, PJ01366401, and PJ01369001 to K.-H.J.); a National Research Foundation of Korea grant, funded by the Korea government (MSIP) (2018R1A4A1025158 to K.-H.J.); Kyung Hee University (Khunghee University) (KHU-20150645 to K.-H.J.); the Rural Development Administration, Republic of Korea; and the Strategic Initiative for Micro-biomes in Agriculture and Food, funded by the Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (grant no.: 916006-2 to H.-S.C.). 2Author for contact: khjung2010@khu.ac.kr. 3Senior author.

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the Rural Development Administration Next-Generation BioGreen 21 Program (grants PJ01325901, PJ01366401, and PJ01369001 to K.-H.J.); a National Research Foundation of Korea grant, funded by the Korea government (MSIP) (2018R1A4A1025158 to K.-H.J.); Kyung Hee University (Khunghee University) (KHU-20150645 to K.-H.J.); the Rural Development Administration, Republic of Korea; and the Strategic Initiative for Microbiomes in Agriculture and Food, funded by the Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (grant no.: 916006-2 to H.-S.C.).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 American Society of Plant Biologists.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Genetics
  • Plant Science

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