Rules versus evidence in memory and non-memory decision-making

Ian G. Dobbins, Sanghoon Han

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent research using functional magnetic resonance imaging has revealed that memory retrieval often places considerable demands on the prefrontal cortex (PFC), a region known to underpin complex decision-making. Regional dissociations within PFC suggest that memory retrieval recruits several decision processes shared with complex decision making in non-memory domains. Here we briefly review data highlighting the role of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) during memory and non-memory judgments, which suggest that dlPFC is sensitive to decision complexity during memory retrieval. As decision complexity increases, decision-makers may be more susceptible to stress and/or fatigue with consequent failures of memory judgment.

Original languageEnglish
JournalMilitary Psychology
Volume21
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Decision Making
Prefrontal Cortex
decision making
evidence
fatigue
Fatigue
decision maker
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

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Rules versus evidence in memory and non-memory decision-making. / Dobbins, Ian G.; Han, Sanghoon.

In: Military Psychology, Vol. 21, No. SUPPL. 1, 01.01.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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