Science and politics in the Hawaiian Kingdom: The progress of the Honolulu social science association, 1882–87

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The growth in studies of Indigenous responses to the gradual foreign control and American annexation of the Hawaiian Islands has provided an important corrective to dominant trends in earlier Hawaiian historiography, but there has been comparatively little recent work on the attitudes and values of those identified as colonizers. In particular, how Western ideas were understood and appropriated within the context of Hawaiian politics is not well known. This article extends scholarship demonstrating how in colonizing contexts, ideas about science could be mobilized as a moral resource and scientific societies could become distinct social formations. Specifically, the article shows how, during the pre-annexation period, the predominantly White and Hawaiian-born members of the Honolulu Social Science Association gathered in the performance of scientific modernity, with an implicit yet overarching political aim.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)133-147
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Pacific History
Volume53
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Apr 3

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cultural Studies
  • History
  • Sociology and Political Science

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