Seed density is as important as limiting similarity, diversity effect, and propagule pressure in plant restoration to control invasion

Chaeho Byun, Minwoo Oh, Eun Ju Lee, Hojeong Kang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Restoring invasion-resistant plant communities is critical for the successful control of invasive plant species. It is based on ecological principles, such as limiting similarity, and the diversity–invasibility hypothesis, which can be used to select optimal combinations of species and determine appropriate plant density for the effective suppression of invasion due to propagule pressure. However, no attempt has been made to combine these factors in a single research framework. Here, we show for the first time the relative importance of all significant factors, including seed density, limiting similarity, diversity effect, and propagule pressure, in the invasion mechanism of Sicyos angulatus, an invasive plant species. Our results suggest that seed density, rarely explored in previous studies, is as important a determinant of invasion success as limiting similarity, diversity effect, and propagule pressure. Thus, the density-mediated mechanism must be given careful consideration for the restoration of strong invasion-resistant native plant communities.

Original languageEnglish
Article number105712
JournalEcological Engineering
Volume144
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Feb 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

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