Self-assembly of supramolecular polymers into tunable helical structures

Ho Joong Kim, Yong-beom Lim, Myongsoo Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is growing interest in the design of synthetic molecules that are able to selfassemble into a polymeric chain with compact helical conformations, which is analogous to the folded state of natural proteins. Herein, we highlight supramolecular approach to the formation of helical architectures and their conformational changes driven by external stimuli. Helical organization in synthetic self-assemblingsystems can be achieved by the various types of noncovalent interactions, which include hydrogen bonding, solvophobic effects, and metal-ligand interactions. Since the external environment can have a large influence on the strength and configuration of noncovalent interactions between the individual components, stimulus-induced alterations in the intramolecular noncovalent interactions can result in dynamic conformational changeof the supramolecular helical structure thus, driving significant changes in the properties of the materials. Therefore, these supramolecular helices hold great promise as stimuli-responsive materials.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1925-1935
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Polymer Science, Part A: Polymer Chemistry
Volume46
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Mar 15

Fingerprint

Self assembly
Polymers
Conformations
Hydrogen bonds
Metals
Ligands
Proteins
Molecules

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Polymers and Plastics
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

@article{83f20cad7d874f76a948b749dbb43967,
title = "Self-assembly of supramolecular polymers into tunable helical structures",
abstract = "There is growing interest in the design of synthetic molecules that are able to selfassemble into a polymeric chain with compact helical conformations, which is analogous to the folded state of natural proteins. Herein, we highlight supramolecular approach to the formation of helical architectures and their conformational changes driven by external stimuli. Helical organization in synthetic self-assemblingsystems can be achieved by the various types of noncovalent interactions, which include hydrogen bonding, solvophobic effects, and metal-ligand interactions. Since the external environment can have a large influence on the strength and configuration of noncovalent interactions between the individual components, stimulus-induced alterations in the intramolecular noncovalent interactions can result in dynamic conformational changeof the supramolecular helical structure thus, driving significant changes in the properties of the materials. Therefore, these supramolecular helices hold great promise as stimuli-responsive materials.",
author = "Kim, {Ho Joong} and Yong-beom Lim and Myongsoo Lee",
year = "2008",
month = "3",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1002/pola.22569",
language = "English",
volume = "46",
pages = "1925--1935",
journal = "Journal of Polymer Science, Part A: Polymer Chemistry",
issn = "0887-624X",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "6",

}

Self-assembly of supramolecular polymers into tunable helical structures. / Kim, Ho Joong; Lim, Yong-beom; Lee, Myongsoo.

In: Journal of Polymer Science, Part A: Polymer Chemistry, Vol. 46, No. 6, 15.03.2008, p. 1925-1935.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Self-assembly of supramolecular polymers into tunable helical structures

AU - Kim, Ho Joong

AU - Lim, Yong-beom

AU - Lee, Myongsoo

PY - 2008/3/15

Y1 - 2008/3/15

N2 - There is growing interest in the design of synthetic molecules that are able to selfassemble into a polymeric chain with compact helical conformations, which is analogous to the folded state of natural proteins. Herein, we highlight supramolecular approach to the formation of helical architectures and their conformational changes driven by external stimuli. Helical organization in synthetic self-assemblingsystems can be achieved by the various types of noncovalent interactions, which include hydrogen bonding, solvophobic effects, and metal-ligand interactions. Since the external environment can have a large influence on the strength and configuration of noncovalent interactions between the individual components, stimulus-induced alterations in the intramolecular noncovalent interactions can result in dynamic conformational changeof the supramolecular helical structure thus, driving significant changes in the properties of the materials. Therefore, these supramolecular helices hold great promise as stimuli-responsive materials.

AB - There is growing interest in the design of synthetic molecules that are able to selfassemble into a polymeric chain with compact helical conformations, which is analogous to the folded state of natural proteins. Herein, we highlight supramolecular approach to the formation of helical architectures and their conformational changes driven by external stimuli. Helical organization in synthetic self-assemblingsystems can be achieved by the various types of noncovalent interactions, which include hydrogen bonding, solvophobic effects, and metal-ligand interactions. Since the external environment can have a large influence on the strength and configuration of noncovalent interactions between the individual components, stimulus-induced alterations in the intramolecular noncovalent interactions can result in dynamic conformational changeof the supramolecular helical structure thus, driving significant changes in the properties of the materials. Therefore, these supramolecular helices hold great promise as stimuli-responsive materials.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=40549107975&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=40549107975&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/pola.22569

DO - 10.1002/pola.22569

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:40549107975

VL - 46

SP - 1925

EP - 1935

JO - Journal of Polymer Science, Part A: Polymer Chemistry

JF - Journal of Polymer Science, Part A: Polymer Chemistry

SN - 0887-624X

IS - 6

ER -