Self-reported adherence to a low-sodium diet and health outcomes in patients with heart failure

Eun Kyeung Song, Debra K. Moser, seokmin kang, Terry A. Lennie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Most clinicians rely on patients' self-report of following a low-sodium diet to determine adherence of patients with heart failure (HF). Whether self-reported adherence to a low-sodium diet is associated with cardiac event-free survival is unclear. Purposes: To determine (1) whether self-reported is concordant with adherence to a low-sodium diet measured by food diaries and 24-hour urinary sodium excretion and (2) whether self-reported adherence to a low-sodium diet predicts cardiac event-free survival. Methods: Adherence to a low-sodium diet was measured using 3 measures in 119 HF patients: (1) self-reported adherence, 1 item from the Self-care of Heart Failure Index scale; (2) a 3-day food diary; (3) 24-hour urinary sodium excretion. Patients were followed up for a median of 297 days to determine cardiac hospitalization or emergency department visit. One-way analysis of variance and Cox regression were used to address our purposes. Results: Self-reported adherence was concordant with adherence to a low-sodium diet measured by food diaries and 24-hour urinary sodium excretion. Thirty-one patients who reported they always follow a low-sodium diet had an average sodium intake less than 3 g/d (F = 5.07, P =.002) and 3.3 g of a mean 24-hour urinary sodium excretion (F = 3.393, P =.020). Patients who reported they never or rarely follow a low-sodium diet had 4.7 times greater risk of having cardiac events than did those who always followed a low-sodium diet (P =.017). Conclusion: Self-reported adherence to a low-sodium diet predicted cardiac event-free survival demonstrating clinicians can use this as an indicator of adherence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)529-534
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Cardiovascular Nursing
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Nov 1

Fingerprint

Sodium-Restricted Diet
Heart Failure
Health
Diet Records
Sodium
Disease-Free Survival
Patient Compliance
Self Care
Self Report
Hospital Emergency Service
Analysis of Variance
Hospitalization

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Advanced and Specialised Nursing

Cite this

Song, Eun Kyeung ; Moser, Debra K. ; kang, seokmin ; Lennie, Terry A. / Self-reported adherence to a low-sodium diet and health outcomes in patients with heart failure. In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing. 2016 ; Vol. 31, No. 6. pp. 529-534.
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abstract = "Background: Most clinicians rely on patients' self-report of following a low-sodium diet to determine adherence of patients with heart failure (HF). Whether self-reported adherence to a low-sodium diet is associated with cardiac event-free survival is unclear. Purposes: To determine (1) whether self-reported is concordant with adherence to a low-sodium diet measured by food diaries and 24-hour urinary sodium excretion and (2) whether self-reported adherence to a low-sodium diet predicts cardiac event-free survival. Methods: Adherence to a low-sodium diet was measured using 3 measures in 119 HF patients: (1) self-reported adherence, 1 item from the Self-care of Heart Failure Index scale; (2) a 3-day food diary; (3) 24-hour urinary sodium excretion. Patients were followed up for a median of 297 days to determine cardiac hospitalization or emergency department visit. One-way analysis of variance and Cox regression were used to address our purposes. Results: Self-reported adherence was concordant with adherence to a low-sodium diet measured by food diaries and 24-hour urinary sodium excretion. Thirty-one patients who reported they always follow a low-sodium diet had an average sodium intake less than 3 g/d (F = 5.07, P =.002) and 3.3 g of a mean 24-hour urinary sodium excretion (F = 3.393, P =.020). Patients who reported they never or rarely follow a low-sodium diet had 4.7 times greater risk of having cardiac events than did those who always followed a low-sodium diet (P =.017). Conclusion: Self-reported adherence to a low-sodium diet predicted cardiac event-free survival demonstrating clinicians can use this as an indicator of adherence.",
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Self-reported adherence to a low-sodium diet and health outcomes in patients with heart failure. / Song, Eun Kyeung; Moser, Debra K.; kang, seokmin; Lennie, Terry A.

In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, Vol. 31, No. 6, 01.11.2016, p. 529-534.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - Background: Most clinicians rely on patients' self-report of following a low-sodium diet to determine adherence of patients with heart failure (HF). Whether self-reported adherence to a low-sodium diet is associated with cardiac event-free survival is unclear. Purposes: To determine (1) whether self-reported is concordant with adherence to a low-sodium diet measured by food diaries and 24-hour urinary sodium excretion and (2) whether self-reported adherence to a low-sodium diet predicts cardiac event-free survival. Methods: Adherence to a low-sodium diet was measured using 3 measures in 119 HF patients: (1) self-reported adherence, 1 item from the Self-care of Heart Failure Index scale; (2) a 3-day food diary; (3) 24-hour urinary sodium excretion. Patients were followed up for a median of 297 days to determine cardiac hospitalization or emergency department visit. One-way analysis of variance and Cox regression were used to address our purposes. Results: Self-reported adherence was concordant with adherence to a low-sodium diet measured by food diaries and 24-hour urinary sodium excretion. Thirty-one patients who reported they always follow a low-sodium diet had an average sodium intake less than 3 g/d (F = 5.07, P =.002) and 3.3 g of a mean 24-hour urinary sodium excretion (F = 3.393, P =.020). Patients who reported they never or rarely follow a low-sodium diet had 4.7 times greater risk of having cardiac events than did those who always followed a low-sodium diet (P =.017). Conclusion: Self-reported adherence to a low-sodium diet predicted cardiac event-free survival demonstrating clinicians can use this as an indicator of adherence.

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