Serum amyloid A as a useful indicator of disease activity in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

Sang Youn Jung, Min Chan Park, Yong Beom Park, Soo Kon Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate whether serum amyloid A (SAA) levels are increased in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and whether its levels correlate well with AS disease activity. Materials and Methods: Thirty-eight patients with AS and 38 age- and sex-matched control subjects were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Their SAA levels were quantitatively measured by immunonephelometry. An established, self-administered instrument for evaluating disease activity (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, BASDAI) was used to measure and acute phase reactants, including erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP), in patients with AS. Results: Patients with AS had a significantly higher mean SAA level than controls (9.52 ± 7.49 mg/L versus 2.73 ± 1.57 mg/L, p < 0.05), and the mean BASDAI score of patients with elevated SAA levels was significantly higher than that of patients with normal SAA levels (5.6 ± 1.3 versus 4.4 ± 1.5, p < 0.05). SAA levels showed significant correlations with BASDAI scores (r = 0.431, p = 0.007), ESR (r = 0.521, p = 0.001) and CRP levels (r = 0.648, p < 0.001). Additionally, the correlation between ESR and CRP levels also appeared significant (r = 0.703, p < 0.001). In those with normal ESR or CRP levels, SAA levels and BASDAI scores were elevated (p < 0.05) and showed a trend of positive correlation with one another. Conclusion: Our data showed that SAA levels were increased in patients with AS and correlated well with disease activity. These findings suggest that SAA can be used as a valuable indicator of disease activity in AS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)218-224
Number of pages7
JournalYonsei medical journal
Volume48
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Apr 1

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Serum Amyloid A Protein
Ankylosing Spondylitis
Blood Sedimentation
Baths
C-Reactive Protein
Acute-Phase Proteins
Cross-Sectional Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Jung, Sang Youn ; Park, Min Chan ; Park, Yong Beom ; Lee, Soo Kon. / Serum amyloid A as a useful indicator of disease activity in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. In: Yonsei medical journal. 2007 ; Vol. 48, No. 2. pp. 218-224.
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Serum amyloid A as a useful indicator of disease activity in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. / Jung, Sang Youn; Park, Min Chan; Park, Yong Beom; Lee, Soo Kon.

In: Yonsei medical journal, Vol. 48, No. 2, 01.04.2007, p. 218-224.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Purpose: To investigate whether serum amyloid A (SAA) levels are increased in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and whether its levels correlate well with AS disease activity. Materials and Methods: Thirty-eight patients with AS and 38 age- and sex-matched control subjects were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Their SAA levels were quantitatively measured by immunonephelometry. An established, self-administered instrument for evaluating disease activity (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, BASDAI) was used to measure and acute phase reactants, including erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP), in patients with AS. Results: Patients with AS had a significantly higher mean SAA level than controls (9.52 ± 7.49 mg/L versus 2.73 ± 1.57 mg/L, p < 0.05), and the mean BASDAI score of patients with elevated SAA levels was significantly higher than that of patients with normal SAA levels (5.6 ± 1.3 versus 4.4 ± 1.5, p < 0.05). SAA levels showed significant correlations with BASDAI scores (r = 0.431, p = 0.007), ESR (r = 0.521, p = 0.001) and CRP levels (r = 0.648, p < 0.001). Additionally, the correlation between ESR and CRP levels also appeared significant (r = 0.703, p < 0.001). In those with normal ESR or CRP levels, SAA levels and BASDAI scores were elevated (p < 0.05) and showed a trend of positive correlation with one another. Conclusion: Our data showed that SAA levels were increased in patients with AS and correlated well with disease activity. These findings suggest that SAA can be used as a valuable indicator of disease activity in AS.

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