Sex Difference in the Association between High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein and Depression

The 2016 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

San Lee, Sarah Soyeon Oh, Sung In Jang, Euncheol Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Elevated levels of circulating high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) have been observed in depression, with the body mass index (BMI) being a major mediator of this association. However, the sex difference in the association between hs-CRP and depression remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the sex difference in the association between hs-CRP and depression. Data from the 2016 Korea National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey were used for our study. High hs-CRP was defined as >3.0 mg/L, while depression was determined using a cut-off score of 10 in the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. The study population comprised 5,483 Korean adults. Men with high hs-CRP levels showed statistically higher prevalence of depression than those with low hs-CRP levels (8.90% vs. 3.65%, P < 0.0001). The high hs-CRP group was 1.86 times more likely to have depression after adjusting for BMI and other covariates in men (adjusted odds ratio: 1.86; 95% confidence interval: 1.07–3.25; P = 0.029). Meanwhile, no statistically significant association between hs-CRP and depression was found among women. Depression was considerably associated with hs-CRP only in men, indicating a biological difference between men and women that can independently modify the relationship between hs-CRP and depression.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1918
JournalScientific reports
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Dec 1

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Adjustment Disorders
Nutrition Surveys
Korea
Sex Characteristics
C-Reactive Protein
Depression
Body Mass Index
Health
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

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title = "Sex Difference in the Association between High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein and Depression: The 2016 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey",
abstract = "Elevated levels of circulating high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) have been observed in depression, with the body mass index (BMI) being a major mediator of this association. However, the sex difference in the association between hs-CRP and depression remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the sex difference in the association between hs-CRP and depression. Data from the 2016 Korea National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey were used for our study. High hs-CRP was defined as >3.0 mg/L, while depression was determined using a cut-off score of 10 in the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. The study population comprised 5,483 Korean adults. Men with high hs-CRP levels showed statistically higher prevalence of depression than those with low hs-CRP levels (8.90{\%} vs. 3.65{\%}, P < 0.0001). The high hs-CRP group was 1.86 times more likely to have depression after adjusting for BMI and other covariates in men (adjusted odds ratio: 1.86; 95{\%} confidence interval: 1.07–3.25; P = 0.029). Meanwhile, no statistically significant association between hs-CRP and depression was found among women. Depression was considerably associated with hs-CRP only in men, indicating a biological difference between men and women that can independently modify the relationship between hs-CRP and depression.",
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Sex Difference in the Association between High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein and Depression : The 2016 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. / Lee, San; Oh, Sarah Soyeon; Jang, Sung In; Park, Euncheol.

In: Scientific reports, Vol. 9, No. 1, 1918, 01.12.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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