Should nasal biopsy inevitably be performed for classifying granulomatosis with polyangiitis in patients with rhinosinusitis? A retrospective chart review study

Juyoung Yoo, Sung Soo Ahn, Seung Min Jung, Jason Jungsik Song, YongBeom Park, Sang Won Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Nasal biopsy is the essential method for differentiating and diagnosing granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis. Nevertheless, in the real clinical settings, there are several cases unable for nasal biopsy. Hence, in this study, we investigated initial clinical manifestations and laboratory factors which could be helpful for diagnosing GPA in cases unable for nasal biopsy performance. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 45 patients with GPA. Twenty-five patients exhibited chronic rhinosinusitis, among which 16 patients underwent nasal biopsy. We applied the 2007 European Medicines Agency algorithm for the classification of GPA, the 2012 Chapel Hill Consensus Conferences Nomenclature of Vasculitis and the 2017 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism provisional classification criteria for GPA to them for reclassifying GPA. Among six patients without granuloma on nasal biopsy, three patients with only antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) and chronic rhinosinusitis could be classified as GPA due to proteinase 3 (PR3)-ANCA (or cytoplasmic (C)-ANCA) positivity. Among nine patients without nasal biopsy, three patients with only chronic rhinosinusitis could be classified as GPA due to GPA-specific lung lesions. When we excluded an item of granuloma in ten GPA patients with granuloma on nasal biopsy, four patients without ANCAs could be classified as GPA due to GPA-specific lung lesions and cartilaginous involvement. In conclusion, PR3-ANCA (or C-ANCA) positivity, GPA-specific lung lesions and cartilaginous involvement could help physicians in charge make a final diagnosis of GPA in cases unable for nasal biopsy.

Original languageEnglish
JournalRheumatology International
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 1

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Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis
Nose
Biopsy
Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies
Granuloma
Myeloblastin
Lung
Vasculitis
Terminology
Medical Records

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

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title = "Should nasal biopsy inevitably be performed for classifying granulomatosis with polyangiitis in patients with rhinosinusitis? A retrospective chart review study",
abstract = "Nasal biopsy is the essential method for differentiating and diagnosing granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis. Nevertheless, in the real clinical settings, there are several cases unable for nasal biopsy. Hence, in this study, we investigated initial clinical manifestations and laboratory factors which could be helpful for diagnosing GPA in cases unable for nasal biopsy performance. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 45 patients with GPA. Twenty-five patients exhibited chronic rhinosinusitis, among which 16 patients underwent nasal biopsy. We applied the 2007 European Medicines Agency algorithm for the classification of GPA, the 2012 Chapel Hill Consensus Conferences Nomenclature of Vasculitis and the 2017 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism provisional classification criteria for GPA to them for reclassifying GPA. Among six patients without granuloma on nasal biopsy, three patients with only antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) and chronic rhinosinusitis could be classified as GPA due to proteinase 3 (PR3)-ANCA (or cytoplasmic (C)-ANCA) positivity. Among nine patients without nasal biopsy, three patients with only chronic rhinosinusitis could be classified as GPA due to GPA-specific lung lesions. When we excluded an item of granuloma in ten GPA patients with granuloma on nasal biopsy, four patients without ANCAs could be classified as GPA due to GPA-specific lung lesions and cartilaginous involvement. In conclusion, PR3-ANCA (or C-ANCA) positivity, GPA-specific lung lesions and cartilaginous involvement could help physicians in charge make a final diagnosis of GPA in cases unable for nasal biopsy.",
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Should nasal biopsy inevitably be performed for classifying granulomatosis with polyangiitis in patients with rhinosinusitis? A retrospective chart review study. / Yoo, Juyoung; Ahn, Sung Soo; Jung, Seung Min; Song, Jason Jungsik; Park, YongBeom; Lee, Sang Won.

In: Rheumatology International, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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AU - Yoo, Juyoung

AU - Ahn, Sung Soo

AU - Jung, Seung Min

AU - Song, Jason Jungsik

AU - Park, YongBeom

AU - Lee, Sang Won

PY - 2019/1/1

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N2 - Nasal biopsy is the essential method for differentiating and diagnosing granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis. Nevertheless, in the real clinical settings, there are several cases unable for nasal biopsy. Hence, in this study, we investigated initial clinical manifestations and laboratory factors which could be helpful for diagnosing GPA in cases unable for nasal biopsy performance. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 45 patients with GPA. Twenty-five patients exhibited chronic rhinosinusitis, among which 16 patients underwent nasal biopsy. We applied the 2007 European Medicines Agency algorithm for the classification of GPA, the 2012 Chapel Hill Consensus Conferences Nomenclature of Vasculitis and the 2017 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism provisional classification criteria for GPA to them for reclassifying GPA. Among six patients without granuloma on nasal biopsy, three patients with only antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) and chronic rhinosinusitis could be classified as GPA due to proteinase 3 (PR3)-ANCA (or cytoplasmic (C)-ANCA) positivity. Among nine patients without nasal biopsy, three patients with only chronic rhinosinusitis could be classified as GPA due to GPA-specific lung lesions. When we excluded an item of granuloma in ten GPA patients with granuloma on nasal biopsy, four patients without ANCAs could be classified as GPA due to GPA-specific lung lesions and cartilaginous involvement. In conclusion, PR3-ANCA (or C-ANCA) positivity, GPA-specific lung lesions and cartilaginous involvement could help physicians in charge make a final diagnosis of GPA in cases unable for nasal biopsy.

AB - Nasal biopsy is the essential method for differentiating and diagnosing granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis. Nevertheless, in the real clinical settings, there are several cases unable for nasal biopsy. Hence, in this study, we investigated initial clinical manifestations and laboratory factors which could be helpful for diagnosing GPA in cases unable for nasal biopsy performance. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 45 patients with GPA. Twenty-five patients exhibited chronic rhinosinusitis, among which 16 patients underwent nasal biopsy. We applied the 2007 European Medicines Agency algorithm for the classification of GPA, the 2012 Chapel Hill Consensus Conferences Nomenclature of Vasculitis and the 2017 American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism provisional classification criteria for GPA to them for reclassifying GPA. Among six patients without granuloma on nasal biopsy, three patients with only antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) and chronic rhinosinusitis could be classified as GPA due to proteinase 3 (PR3)-ANCA (or cytoplasmic (C)-ANCA) positivity. Among nine patients without nasal biopsy, three patients with only chronic rhinosinusitis could be classified as GPA due to GPA-specific lung lesions. When we excluded an item of granuloma in ten GPA patients with granuloma on nasal biopsy, four patients without ANCAs could be classified as GPA due to GPA-specific lung lesions and cartilaginous involvement. In conclusion, PR3-ANCA (or C-ANCA) positivity, GPA-specific lung lesions and cartilaginous involvement could help physicians in charge make a final diagnosis of GPA in cases unable for nasal biopsy.

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