Simple high-throughput analytical method using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry to quantify total 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol in urine

Jun Young Yang, Hyun Kyong Ahn, Si Won Lee, You Jung Han, Young Jun Oh, E. Yadira Velázquez-Armenta, Alejandro A. Nava-Ocampo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Since the urinary concentration of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) is a reliable biomarker of exposure to tobacco smoke, we developed a relatively simple high-throughput chromatographic method to quantify total urinary NNAL concentrations in the general population. Methods: The high-throughput analytical method was developed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) to identify and quantify total urinary NNAL concentrations in 10 non-smokers and 15 otherwise healthy smokers. Results: Loss of nitric oxide at m/z 30 was found to be the predominant mass transitioned, and therefore was used as the SIM transition to quantify both NNAL and NNAL-methyl-d3 in urine. The analytical method did not require sample derivatization. Standard curves for total NNAL concentrations were linear between 20 and 1500 pg/mL, with coefficients of determination >0.95. Precision and accuracy ranged from 2.2% to 8.6% (CV) and from -5.6% to 10.9% (percent error), respectively. The lowest limit of quantification was 6.7 pg/mL, and 2.0 pg/mL the lowest limit of detection (LLOD). Total urinary NNAL concentrations in non-smoker subjects were <LLOD, whereas in smokers varied between <LLOD to 112.1 pg/mL. Conclusions: An UPLC-MS/MS analytical method to quantify total urinary NNAL concentrations in smokers that does not require sample derivatization is presented herein. The method could be useful in clarifying the toxicities associated with human exposure to cigarette smoking. However, quantification might be adversely affected by co-eluting interfering compounds or selective ion suppression or enhancement as a result of having only one ion transition to monitor NNAL and NNAL-methyl-d3 in urine.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1249-1257
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine
Volume53
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1

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Liquid chromatography
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Liquid Chromatography
Mass spectrometry
Throughput
Urine
Ions
Tobacco
Biomarkers
Smoke
Tobacco Products
Toxicity
Limit of Detection
Nitric Oxide
4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butan-1-ol
Smoking
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical

Cite this

Yang, Jun Young ; Ahn, Hyun Kyong ; Lee, Si Won ; Han, You Jung ; Oh, Young Jun ; Velázquez-Armenta, E. Yadira ; Nava-Ocampo, Alejandro A. / Simple high-throughput analytical method using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry to quantify total 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol in urine. In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 53, No. 8. pp. 1249-1257.
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abstract = "Background: Since the urinary concentration of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) is a reliable biomarker of exposure to tobacco smoke, we developed a relatively simple high-throughput chromatographic method to quantify total urinary NNAL concentrations in the general population. Methods: The high-throughput analytical method was developed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) to identify and quantify total urinary NNAL concentrations in 10 non-smokers and 15 otherwise healthy smokers. Results: Loss of nitric oxide at m/z 30 was found to be the predominant mass transitioned, and therefore was used as the SIM transition to quantify both NNAL and NNAL-methyl-d3 in urine. The analytical method did not require sample derivatization. Standard curves for total NNAL concentrations were linear between 20 and 1500 pg/mL, with coefficients of determination >0.95. Precision and accuracy ranged from 2.2{\%} to 8.6{\%} (CV) and from -5.6{\%} to 10.9{\%} (percent error), respectively. The lowest limit of quantification was 6.7 pg/mL, and 2.0 pg/mL the lowest limit of detection (LLOD). Total urinary NNAL concentrations in non-smoker subjects were <LLOD, whereas in smokers varied between <LLOD to 112.1 pg/mL. Conclusions: An UPLC-MS/MS analytical method to quantify total urinary NNAL concentrations in smokers that does not require sample derivatization is presented herein. The method could be useful in clarifying the toxicities associated with human exposure to cigarette smoking. However, quantification might be adversely affected by co-eluting interfering compounds or selective ion suppression or enhancement as a result of having only one ion transition to monitor NNAL and NNAL-methyl-d3 in urine.",
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Simple high-throughput analytical method using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry to quantify total 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol in urine. / Yang, Jun Young; Ahn, Hyun Kyong; Lee, Si Won; Han, You Jung; Oh, Young Jun; Velázquez-Armenta, E. Yadira; Nava-Ocampo, Alejandro A.

In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, Vol. 53, No. 8, 01.01.2015, p. 1249-1257.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Simple high-throughput analytical method using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry to quantify total 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol in urine

AU - Yang, Jun Young

AU - Ahn, Hyun Kyong

AU - Lee, Si Won

AU - Han, You Jung

AU - Oh, Young Jun

AU - Velázquez-Armenta, E. Yadira

AU - Nava-Ocampo, Alejandro A.

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Background: Since the urinary concentration of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) is a reliable biomarker of exposure to tobacco smoke, we developed a relatively simple high-throughput chromatographic method to quantify total urinary NNAL concentrations in the general population. Methods: The high-throughput analytical method was developed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) to identify and quantify total urinary NNAL concentrations in 10 non-smokers and 15 otherwise healthy smokers. Results: Loss of nitric oxide at m/z 30 was found to be the predominant mass transitioned, and therefore was used as the SIM transition to quantify both NNAL and NNAL-methyl-d3 in urine. The analytical method did not require sample derivatization. Standard curves for total NNAL concentrations were linear between 20 and 1500 pg/mL, with coefficients of determination >0.95. Precision and accuracy ranged from 2.2% to 8.6% (CV) and from -5.6% to 10.9% (percent error), respectively. The lowest limit of quantification was 6.7 pg/mL, and 2.0 pg/mL the lowest limit of detection (LLOD). Total urinary NNAL concentrations in non-smoker subjects were <LLOD, whereas in smokers varied between <LLOD to 112.1 pg/mL. Conclusions: An UPLC-MS/MS analytical method to quantify total urinary NNAL concentrations in smokers that does not require sample derivatization is presented herein. The method could be useful in clarifying the toxicities associated with human exposure to cigarette smoking. However, quantification might be adversely affected by co-eluting interfering compounds or selective ion suppression or enhancement as a result of having only one ion transition to monitor NNAL and NNAL-methyl-d3 in urine.

AB - Background: Since the urinary concentration of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) is a reliable biomarker of exposure to tobacco smoke, we developed a relatively simple high-throughput chromatographic method to quantify total urinary NNAL concentrations in the general population. Methods: The high-throughput analytical method was developed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) to identify and quantify total urinary NNAL concentrations in 10 non-smokers and 15 otherwise healthy smokers. Results: Loss of nitric oxide at m/z 30 was found to be the predominant mass transitioned, and therefore was used as the SIM transition to quantify both NNAL and NNAL-methyl-d3 in urine. The analytical method did not require sample derivatization. Standard curves for total NNAL concentrations were linear between 20 and 1500 pg/mL, with coefficients of determination >0.95. Precision and accuracy ranged from 2.2% to 8.6% (CV) and from -5.6% to 10.9% (percent error), respectively. The lowest limit of quantification was 6.7 pg/mL, and 2.0 pg/mL the lowest limit of detection (LLOD). Total urinary NNAL concentrations in non-smoker subjects were <LLOD, whereas in smokers varied between <LLOD to 112.1 pg/mL. Conclusions: An UPLC-MS/MS analytical method to quantify total urinary NNAL concentrations in smokers that does not require sample derivatization is presented herein. The method could be useful in clarifying the toxicities associated with human exposure to cigarette smoking. However, quantification might be adversely affected by co-eluting interfering compounds or selective ion suppression or enhancement as a result of having only one ion transition to monitor NNAL and NNAL-methyl-d3 in urine.

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