Simultaneous sterno-thoracic cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves short-term survival rate in canine cardiac arrests

Sung Oh Hwang, Kang Hyun Lee, Jin Woong Lee, Seo Young Lee, Byung Su Yoo, Junghan Yoon, Kyung Hoon Choe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have reported previously that simultaneous sterno-thoracic cardiopulmonary resuscitation (SST-CPR) using a device that compresses the sternum and constricts the thorax circumferentially during a compression systole that can be achieved using standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation (STD-CPR). This study was designed to assess whether SST-CPR improves the survival rate of dogs with cardiac arrest compared with STD-CPR. Twenty-nine mongrel dogs (19-31 kg) were enrolled in this study. After 4 min of ventricular fibrillation induced by an AC current, animals were randomized to be resuscitated by either STD-CPR (n=15) or SST-CPR (n=14). Defibrillation was attempted 10 min after the induction of cardiac arrest. Standard advanced cardiac life support was started if defibrillation was unsuccessful. Aortic blood pressure, coronary perfusion pressure, and end tidal CO2 tension were measured during CPR and the post-resuscitation period. Survival was determined 12 h after the induction of cardiac arrest. SST-CPR resulted in a significantly (P<0.001) higher systolic arterial pressure (91±47 vs 47±24 mmHg), diastolic pressure (43±24 vs 17±10 mmHg), coronary perfusion pressure (35±25 vs 13±9 mmHg), and end tidal CO2 tension (9±4 vs 3±2 mmHg). Two of 15 animals (13%) resuscitated by STD-CPR and seven of 14 animals (50%) resuscitated by SST-CPR survived for 12 h after cardiac arrest (P<0.05). In conclusion, SST-CPR improves the short-term survival rate in canine cardiac arrest compared with STD-CPR.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)209-216
Number of pages8
JournalResuscitation
Volume53
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002 May 20

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Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Heart Arrest
Canidae
Thorax
Arterial Pressure
Perfusion
Advanced Cardiac Life Support
Dogs
Blood Pressure
Pressure
Sternum
Systole
Ventricular Fibrillation
Resuscitation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Emergency
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Hwang, Sung Oh ; Lee, Kang Hyun ; Lee, Jin Woong ; Lee, Seo Young ; Yoo, Byung Su ; Yoon, Junghan ; Choe, Kyung Hoon. / Simultaneous sterno-thoracic cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves short-term survival rate in canine cardiac arrests. In: Resuscitation. 2002 ; Vol. 53, No. 2. pp. 209-216.
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abstract = "We have reported previously that simultaneous sterno-thoracic cardiopulmonary resuscitation (SST-CPR) using a device that compresses the sternum and constricts the thorax circumferentially during a compression systole that can be achieved using standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation (STD-CPR). This study was designed to assess whether SST-CPR improves the survival rate of dogs with cardiac arrest compared with STD-CPR. Twenty-nine mongrel dogs (19-31 kg) were enrolled in this study. After 4 min of ventricular fibrillation induced by an AC current, animals were randomized to be resuscitated by either STD-CPR (n=15) or SST-CPR (n=14). Defibrillation was attempted 10 min after the induction of cardiac arrest. Standard advanced cardiac life support was started if defibrillation was unsuccessful. Aortic blood pressure, coronary perfusion pressure, and end tidal CO2 tension were measured during CPR and the post-resuscitation period. Survival was determined 12 h after the induction of cardiac arrest. SST-CPR resulted in a significantly (P<0.001) higher systolic arterial pressure (91±47 vs 47±24 mmHg), diastolic pressure (43±24 vs 17±10 mmHg), coronary perfusion pressure (35±25 vs 13±9 mmHg), and end tidal CO2 tension (9±4 vs 3±2 mmHg). Two of 15 animals (13{\%}) resuscitated by STD-CPR and seven of 14 animals (50{\%}) resuscitated by SST-CPR survived for 12 h after cardiac arrest (P<0.05). In conclusion, SST-CPR improves the short-term survival rate in canine cardiac arrest compared with STD-CPR.",
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Simultaneous sterno-thoracic cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves short-term survival rate in canine cardiac arrests. / Hwang, Sung Oh; Lee, Kang Hyun; Lee, Jin Woong; Lee, Seo Young; Yoo, Byung Su; Yoon, Junghan; Choe, Kyung Hoon.

In: Resuscitation, Vol. 53, No. 2, 20.05.2002, p. 209-216.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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