Single-port laparoscopic and robotic cholecystectomy in obesity (>25 kg/m2)

Eun Jeong Jang, Young Hoon Roh, Chang Moo Kang, Dong Kyun Kim, Ki Jae Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background and Objectives: Single-port cholecystectomy has emerged as an alternative technique to reduce the number of ports and improve cosmesis. Few previous studies have assessed obesity-related surgical outcomes following single-port cholecystectomy. In this study, technical feasibility and surgical outcomes of single-port laparoscopic cholecystectomy (SPLC) and robotic single-site cholecystectomy (RSSC) in obese patients were investigated. Methods: We conducted a two-center collaborative study and retrospectively reviewed initial experiences of RSSC and SPLC in patients whose body mass index was over 25 kg/m2. Medical records of patients were reviewed. Clinical characteristics and short-term oncologic outcomes were considered and compared between SPLC and RSSC groups. Results: RSSC and SPLC were performed in 39 and 78 patients, respectively. In comparative analysis, the total operative time was longer in the RSSC group (109.92 minutes vs. 60.99 minutes; P ±.001). However, requiring additional port for completion of surgical procedure was less frequent in the RSSC group (0% vs. 12.8%; P =.029). Immediate postoperative pain score was not significantly different between the two groups (4.95 vs. 5.00; P =.882). However, pain score was significantly lower in the RSSC group at the time of discharge (1.79 vs. 2.38; P =.010). Conversion to conventional multiport cholecystectomy, intraoperative bile spillage, or complication rate was not significantly different between the two groups (P >.05). Conclusions: SPLC and RSSC could be safely performed in selected patients with high body mass index, showing no significant clinical differences.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere2019.00005
JournalJournal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Apr 1

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Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy
Robotics
Cholecystectomy
Obesity
Body Mass Index
Operative Time
Postoperative Pain
Bile
Medical Records
Pain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Jang, Eun Jeong ; Roh, Young Hoon ; Kang, Chang Moo ; Kim, Dong Kyun ; Park, Ki Jae. / Single-port laparoscopic and robotic cholecystectomy in obesity (>25 kg/m2). In: Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons. 2019 ; Vol. 23, No. 2.
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abstract = "Background and Objectives: Single-port cholecystectomy has emerged as an alternative technique to reduce the number of ports and improve cosmesis. Few previous studies have assessed obesity-related surgical outcomes following single-port cholecystectomy. In this study, technical feasibility and surgical outcomes of single-port laparoscopic cholecystectomy (SPLC) and robotic single-site cholecystectomy (RSSC) in obese patients were investigated. Methods: We conducted a two-center collaborative study and retrospectively reviewed initial experiences of RSSC and SPLC in patients whose body mass index was over 25 kg/m2. Medical records of patients were reviewed. Clinical characteristics and short-term oncologic outcomes were considered and compared between SPLC and RSSC groups. Results: RSSC and SPLC were performed in 39 and 78 patients, respectively. In comparative analysis, the total operative time was longer in the RSSC group (109.92 minutes vs. 60.99 minutes; P ±.001). However, requiring additional port for completion of surgical procedure was less frequent in the RSSC group (0{\%} vs. 12.8{\%}; P =.029). Immediate postoperative pain score was not significantly different between the two groups (4.95 vs. 5.00; P =.882). However, pain score was significantly lower in the RSSC group at the time of discharge (1.79 vs. 2.38; P =.010). Conversion to conventional multiport cholecystectomy, intraoperative bile spillage, or complication rate was not significantly different between the two groups (P >.05). Conclusions: SPLC and RSSC could be safely performed in selected patients with high body mass index, showing no significant clinical differences.",
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Single-port laparoscopic and robotic cholecystectomy in obesity (>25 kg/m2). / Jang, Eun Jeong; Roh, Young Hoon; Kang, Chang Moo; Kim, Dong Kyun; Park, Ki Jae.

In: Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons, Vol. 23, No. 2, e2019.00005, 01.04.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Single-port laparoscopic and robotic cholecystectomy in obesity (>25 kg/m2)

AU - Jang, Eun Jeong

AU - Roh, Young Hoon

AU - Kang, Chang Moo

AU - Kim, Dong Kyun

AU - Park, Ki Jae

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