Sleep duration and chronic kidney disease: The korean genome and epidemiology study (KoGES)-Kangwha study

Hansol Choi, Hyeon Chang Kim, Joo Young Lee, Ju Mi Lee, Dong Phil Choi, Il Suh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Aims: Sleep duration affects health in various ways. The objective of this study was to investigate the associations of sleep duration with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in a Korean adult population. Methods: This cross-sectional analysis was conducted for total of 1,360 participants who completed baseline health examinations for the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study-Kangwha study in 2010 to 2011. Sleep habits were measured by an interviewer-assisted questionnaire. Sleep duration was calculated based on the number of hours per day participants had slept over the past 1 year. CKD was defined as either proteinuria or estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) < 60 mL/min/1.73 m². Multiple logistic regression models were applied to examine associations between sleep duration and CKD. Results: Women with very long sleep duration (≥ 9 hours/day) were at significantly increased odds for having high serum creatinine (odds ratio [OR], 2.936; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.176 to 7.326), low eGFR (OR, 3.320; 95% CI, 1.372 to 8.034), and CKD (OR, 3.112; 95% CI, 1.315 to 7.363), compared those with a typical sleep duration (7 to < 8 hours/day), after adjusting for sociodemographic status, socioeconomic status, health behaviors, comorbidities, and sleep quality. Among women, for every 1 hour increase in sleep duration per day, there was a 24.6% increase in the presence of CKD (OR, 1.246; 95% CI, 1.019 to 1.523). However, among men, sleep duration was not significantly associated with CKD. Conclusions: Very long sleep duration was independently associated with a higher prevalence of CKD among Korean women. Gender may influence this association.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)323-334
Number of pages12
JournalKorean Journal of Internal Medicine
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jan 1

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Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Sleep
Epidemiology
Genome
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Logistic Models
Health Behavior
Health
Proteinuria
Social Class
Habits
Comorbidity
Creatinine
Cross-Sectional Studies
Interviews

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Choi, Hansol ; Kim, Hyeon Chang ; Lee, Joo Young ; Lee, Ju Mi ; Choi, Dong Phil ; Suh, Il. / Sleep duration and chronic kidney disease : The korean genome and epidemiology study (KoGES)-Kangwha study. In: Korean Journal of Internal Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 32, No. 2. pp. 323-334.
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abstract = "Background/Aims: Sleep duration affects health in various ways. The objective of this study was to investigate the associations of sleep duration with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in a Korean adult population. Methods: This cross-sectional analysis was conducted for total of 1,360 participants who completed baseline health examinations for the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study-Kangwha study in 2010 to 2011. Sleep habits were measured by an interviewer-assisted questionnaire. Sleep duration was calculated based on the number of hours per day participants had slept over the past 1 year. CKD was defined as either proteinuria or estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) < 60 mL/min/1.73 m². Multiple logistic regression models were applied to examine associations between sleep duration and CKD. Results: Women with very long sleep duration (≥ 9 hours/day) were at significantly increased odds for having high serum creatinine (odds ratio [OR], 2.936; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.176 to 7.326), low eGFR (OR, 3.320; 95{\%} CI, 1.372 to 8.034), and CKD (OR, 3.112; 95{\%} CI, 1.315 to 7.363), compared those with a typical sleep duration (7 to < 8 hours/day), after adjusting for sociodemographic status, socioeconomic status, health behaviors, comorbidities, and sleep quality. Among women, for every 1 hour increase in sleep duration per day, there was a 24.6{\%} increase in the presence of CKD (OR, 1.246; 95{\%} CI, 1.019 to 1.523). However, among men, sleep duration was not significantly associated with CKD. Conclusions: Very long sleep duration was independently associated with a higher prevalence of CKD among Korean women. Gender may influence this association.",
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Sleep duration and chronic kidney disease : The korean genome and epidemiology study (KoGES)-Kangwha study. / Choi, Hansol; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Lee, Joo Young; Lee, Ju Mi; Choi, Dong Phil; Suh, Il.

In: Korean Journal of Internal Medicine, Vol. 32, No. 2, 01.01.2017, p. 323-334.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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