Social Support and Occupational Engagement Among Korean Undergraduates: The Moderating and Mediating Effect of Work Volition

Na Rae Kim, Haram J. Kim, Ki Hak Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Career paths are no longer linear or predictable due to the instability and dynamic changes occurring in the work environment. Career researchers have acknowledged this trend and emphasized the significance of individuals’ actual behaviors in career development. Occupational engagement is an essential behavior that leads to successful and satisfactory career development in college students. The current study examined the mediating and moderating roles of work volition in the relationship between social support and occupational engagement. A total of 233 (80 males, 153 females) Korean undergraduates participated in the survey. The results were as follows: Work volition partially mediated the positive relationship between social support and occupational engagement. That is, people who felt they had higher social support reported more work volition, which in turn resulted in more active participation in occupational engagement. Also, the moderation effect of work volition was found between social support and occupational engagement. Thus, the influence of social support on occupational engagement was greater for those with an average or above level of work volition. The results showed that environmental social support and individual work volition are vital factors in improving occupational engagement. The implications and suggestions for practical uses and future research were suggested.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)285-298
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Career Development
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jun 1

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Na-Rae Kim is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Psychology at Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea. Her research interests include occupational and career psychology, specifically in relation to occupational well-being and work volition. She has been working in counseling centers for youth and college students. She enjoys music, reading books, and traveling. Email: kimnarae@yonsei.ac.kr Haram J. Kim recently completed her master’s degree in psychology at Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea. She is currently working as an intern counselor at Korea University Student Counseling Center while working on research projects at Yonsei. Her research interests include career development, calling, and multicultural education. In her free time, she enjoys weight lifting, dancing, and watching movies, and during longer vacations, she loves to travel. Email: haramjulia@yonsei.ac.kr Ki-Hak Lee is a full professor in the Department of Psychology at Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea. He received his PhD in 1997 from Yonsei University and completed his postdoctoral fellowship at University of Missouri–Columbia, Center for Research in Career Development. His primary area of research interest is career psychology, life span career development, counseling psychology, and psychometrics and quantitative psychology. He enjoys golfing and reading books. Email: khlee2445@yonsei.ac.kr

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016, © Curators of the University of Missouri 2016.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychology(all)
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

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