Socioeconomic Contexts of Government Expenditure Across OECD Countries: A Complementary Perspective From Trust and State–Business Relations

Taeyoung Yoo, Whasun Jho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In contrast to the literature which analyzes government size using contingent factors, this article proposes that socioeconomic traditions, such as trust and state–business relations (SBR), complement the explanations of government size in an economy. Using 29 Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) countries from 1995 to 2008, this study shows that a high level of trust is negatively related to government expenditure, whereas tight SBRs are positively related to it even under the decreasing trend of government expenditure. We suggest that attention should be paid to the societal contexts of an economy in addition to its contingent factors, when analyzing changes in political economic activities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)122-150
Number of pages29
JournalAdministration and Society
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Mar 14

Fingerprint

OECD
expenditures
economy
Economic cooperation
Factors
Government expenditure
Socio-economics
Co-development
trend
economics
Economic activity
Government size
Size of government
Political economics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration
  • Marketing

Cite this

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