Spectrally encoded slit confocal microscopy using a wavelength-swept laser

Soocheol Kim, Jaehyun Hwang, Jung Heo, Suho Ryu, Donghak Lee, Sang Hoon Kim, Seung Jae Oh, Chulmin Joo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present an implementation of spectrally encoded slit confocal microscopy. The method employs a rapid wavelength-swept laser as the light source and illuminates a specimen with a line focus that scans through the specimen as the wavelength sweeps. The reflected light from the specimen is imaged with a stationary line scan camera, in which the finite pixel height serves as a slit aperture. This scanner-free operation enables a simple and cost-effective implementation in a small form factor, while allowing for the three-dimensional imaging of biological samples.

Original languageEnglish
Article number036016
JournalJournal of Biomedical Optics
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Mar 1

Fingerprint

Confocal microscopy
slits
microscopy
Wavelength
Lasers
wavelengths
lasers
Light sources
Pixels
Cameras
Imaging techniques
scanners
form factors
light sources
apertures
pixels
cameras
costs
Costs

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Kim, Soocheol ; Hwang, Jaehyun ; Heo, Jung ; Ryu, Suho ; Lee, Donghak ; Kim, Sang Hoon ; Oh, Seung Jae ; Joo, Chulmin. / Spectrally encoded slit confocal microscopy using a wavelength-swept laser. In: Journal of Biomedical Optics. 2015 ; Vol. 20, No. 3.
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Spectrally encoded slit confocal microscopy using a wavelength-swept laser. / Kim, Soocheol; Hwang, Jaehyun; Heo, Jung; Ryu, Suho; Lee, Donghak; Kim, Sang Hoon; Oh, Seung Jae; Joo, Chulmin.

In: Journal of Biomedical Optics, Vol. 20, No. 3, 036016, 01.03.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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