Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with hepatitis B virus-related liver cirrhosis: Community-acquired versus Nosocomial

Seung Up Kim, Young Eun Chon, Chun Kyon Lee, Jun Yong Park, Do Young Kim, Kwang Hyub Han, Chae Yoon Chon, Sinyoung Kim, Kyu Sik Jung, Sang Hoon Ahn

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) frequently develops in patients with liver cirrhosis; however, there is little data to suggest whether the acquisition site of infection influences the prognosis. This study compared the bacteriology, clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of community-acquired SBP (CA-SBP) and nosocomial SBP (N-SBP). Materials and Methods: The medical records of 130 patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related liver cirrhosis, who had experienced a first episode of SBP between January 1999 and December 2008, were reviewed. Results: The study population included 111 (85.4%) patients with CA-SBP and 19 (14.6%) patients with N-SBP. Baseline and microbiological characteristics as well as clinical course, including in-hospital mortality, did not differ between patients with CA-SBP and those with N-SBP (all p>0.05). The median survival time was 6.5 months, and 117 (90.0%) patients died during the follow-up period. Patients with CA-SBP and N-SBP survived for median periods of 6.6 and 6.2 months, respectively, without significant difference (p=0.569). Time to recurrence did not differ between patients with CA-SBP and N-SBP (4.7 vs. 3.6 months, p=0.925). Conclusion: The acquisition site of infection did not affect clinical outcomes for patients with HBV-related liver cirrhosis who had experienced their first episode of SBP. Third-generation cephalosporins may be effective in empirically treating these patients, regardless of the acquisition site of the infection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)328-336
Number of pages9
JournalYonsei medical journal
Volume53
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Mar 1

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Peritonitis
Hepatitis B virus
Liver Cirrhosis
Infection
Bacteriology
Cephalosporins
Hospital Mortality
Medical Records
Recurrence
Survival

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with hepatitis B virus-related liver cirrhosis: Community-acquired versus Nosocomial",
abstract = "Purpose: Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) frequently develops in patients with liver cirrhosis; however, there is little data to suggest whether the acquisition site of infection influences the prognosis. This study compared the bacteriology, clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of community-acquired SBP (CA-SBP) and nosocomial SBP (N-SBP). Materials and Methods: The medical records of 130 patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related liver cirrhosis, who had experienced a first episode of SBP between January 1999 and December 2008, were reviewed. Results: The study population included 111 (85.4{\%}) patients with CA-SBP and 19 (14.6{\%}) patients with N-SBP. Baseline and microbiological characteristics as well as clinical course, including in-hospital mortality, did not differ between patients with CA-SBP and those with N-SBP (all p>0.05). The median survival time was 6.5 months, and 117 (90.0{\%}) patients died during the follow-up period. Patients with CA-SBP and N-SBP survived for median periods of 6.6 and 6.2 months, respectively, without significant difference (p=0.569). Time to recurrence did not differ between patients with CA-SBP and N-SBP (4.7 vs. 3.6 months, p=0.925). Conclusion: The acquisition site of infection did not affect clinical outcomes for patients with HBV-related liver cirrhosis who had experienced their first episode of SBP. Third-generation cephalosporins may be effective in empirically treating these patients, regardless of the acquisition site of the infection.",
author = "Kim, {Seung Up} and Chon, {Young Eun} and Lee, {Chun Kyon} and Park, {Jun Yong} and Kim, {Do Young} and Han, {Kwang Hyub} and Chon, {Chae Yoon} and Sinyoung Kim and Jung, {Kyu Sik} and Ahn, {Sang Hoon}",
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Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with hepatitis B virus-related liver cirrhosis : Community-acquired versus Nosocomial. / Kim, Seung Up; Chon, Young Eun; Lee, Chun Kyon; Park, Jun Yong; Kim, Do Young; Han, Kwang Hyub; Chon, Chae Yoon; Kim, Sinyoung; Jung, Kyu Sik; Ahn, Sang Hoon.

In: Yonsei medical journal, Vol. 53, No. 2, 01.03.2012, p. 328-336.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with hepatitis B virus-related liver cirrhosis

T2 - Community-acquired versus Nosocomial

AU - Kim, Seung Up

AU - Chon, Young Eun

AU - Lee, Chun Kyon

AU - Park, Jun Yong

AU - Kim, Do Young

AU - Han, Kwang Hyub

AU - Chon, Chae Yoon

AU - Kim, Sinyoung

AU - Jung, Kyu Sik

AU - Ahn, Sang Hoon

PY - 2012/3/1

Y1 - 2012/3/1

N2 - Purpose: Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) frequently develops in patients with liver cirrhosis; however, there is little data to suggest whether the acquisition site of infection influences the prognosis. This study compared the bacteriology, clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of community-acquired SBP (CA-SBP) and nosocomial SBP (N-SBP). Materials and Methods: The medical records of 130 patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related liver cirrhosis, who had experienced a first episode of SBP between January 1999 and December 2008, were reviewed. Results: The study population included 111 (85.4%) patients with CA-SBP and 19 (14.6%) patients with N-SBP. Baseline and microbiological characteristics as well as clinical course, including in-hospital mortality, did not differ between patients with CA-SBP and those with N-SBP (all p>0.05). The median survival time was 6.5 months, and 117 (90.0%) patients died during the follow-up period. Patients with CA-SBP and N-SBP survived for median periods of 6.6 and 6.2 months, respectively, without significant difference (p=0.569). Time to recurrence did not differ between patients with CA-SBP and N-SBP (4.7 vs. 3.6 months, p=0.925). Conclusion: The acquisition site of infection did not affect clinical outcomes for patients with HBV-related liver cirrhosis who had experienced their first episode of SBP. Third-generation cephalosporins may be effective in empirically treating these patients, regardless of the acquisition site of the infection.

AB - Purpose: Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) frequently develops in patients with liver cirrhosis; however, there is little data to suggest whether the acquisition site of infection influences the prognosis. This study compared the bacteriology, clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of community-acquired SBP (CA-SBP) and nosocomial SBP (N-SBP). Materials and Methods: The medical records of 130 patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related liver cirrhosis, who had experienced a first episode of SBP between January 1999 and December 2008, were reviewed. Results: The study population included 111 (85.4%) patients with CA-SBP and 19 (14.6%) patients with N-SBP. Baseline and microbiological characteristics as well as clinical course, including in-hospital mortality, did not differ between patients with CA-SBP and those with N-SBP (all p>0.05). The median survival time was 6.5 months, and 117 (90.0%) patients died during the follow-up period. Patients with CA-SBP and N-SBP survived for median periods of 6.6 and 6.2 months, respectively, without significant difference (p=0.569). Time to recurrence did not differ between patients with CA-SBP and N-SBP (4.7 vs. 3.6 months, p=0.925). Conclusion: The acquisition site of infection did not affect clinical outcomes for patients with HBV-related liver cirrhosis who had experienced their first episode of SBP. Third-generation cephalosporins may be effective in empirically treating these patients, regardless of the acquisition site of the infection.

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