Stability of Fe- and Mn-(oxyhydr)oxides in common soil dispersion solutions

Phung N. Manh, Moonis Ali Khan, Byong Hun Jeon, Jae Gon Kim, Giehyeon Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Soil dispersion is a prerequisite process for the separation of metal oxides from bulk soil when magnetic separation is employed to enhance the efficiency for soil treatment. This study examined the stability of goethite, hematite, birnessite, and manganite in common dispersion solutions. The stability of pH in the oxide suspension decreased in the order carbonate (50 mM Na2CO3) > pyrophosphate (50 mM Na4P 2O7) > simple alkaline (1 mM NaOH) solutions regardless of the oxides. Dissolution of the four oxides was negligible in the carbonate and the simple alkaline solutions. In the pyrophosphate solutions, however, the oxides were subject to ligand-promoted dissolution by pyrophosphate ion. The extent of dissolution was highest for goethite followed by manganite, hematite, and birnessite. Dissolved Fe and Mn concentrations reached 68.3 and 4.1 μM for goethite and manganite suspensions, respectively, in 21 days with 5 mM pyrophosphate. Higher pyrophosphate concentrations (up to 150 mM) did not substantially affect the extent of ligand-promoted dissolution due to the limited surface sites of the oxides. The results of this study suggest that the carbonate solution would be more desirable than the simple alkaline or the pyrophosphate solution for soil dispersion in the presence of common Fe or Mn oxides.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)677-687
Number of pages11
JournalWater, Air, and Soil Pollution
Volume217
Issue number1-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 May 1

Fingerprint

Oxides
oxide
Soils
goethite
dissolution
Carbonates
Dissolution
birnessite
soil
carbonate
Hematite
hematite
ligand
Suspensions
Ligands
Magnetic separation
diphosphoric acid
Metals
Ions
ion

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Ecological Modelling
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Pollution

Cite this

Manh, Phung N. ; Ali Khan, Moonis ; Jeon, Byong Hun ; Kim, Jae Gon ; Lee, Giehyeon. / Stability of Fe- and Mn-(oxyhydr)oxides in common soil dispersion solutions. In: Water, Air, and Soil Pollution. 2011 ; Vol. 217, No. 1-4. pp. 677-687.
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Stability of Fe- and Mn-(oxyhydr)oxides in common soil dispersion solutions. / Manh, Phung N.; Ali Khan, Moonis; Jeon, Byong Hun; Kim, Jae Gon; Lee, Giehyeon.

In: Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, Vol. 217, No. 1-4, 01.05.2011, p. 677-687.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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