Statistical processing: Not so implausible after all

Sang Chul Chong, Jun Joo Sung, Tatiana Aloi Emmanouil, Anne Treisman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Myczek and Simons (2008) have shown that findings attributed to a statistical mode of perceptual processing can, instead, be explained by focused attention to samples of just a few items. Some new findings raise questions about this claim. (1) Participants, given conditions that would require different focused attention strategies, did no worse when the conditions were randomly mixed than when they were blocked. (2) Participants were significantly worse at estimating the mean size when given small samples than when given the whole display. (3) One plausible suggested strategy - comparing the largest item in each display, rather than the mean size -was not, in fact, used. Distributed attention to sets of similar stimuli, enabling a statistical-processing mode, provides a coherent account of these and other phenomena.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1327-1334
Number of pages8
JournalPerception and Psychophysics
Volume70
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Oct 1

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Sensory Systems

Cite this

Chong, Sang Chul ; Sung, Jun Joo ; Emmanouil, Tatiana Aloi ; Treisman, Anne. / Statistical processing : Not so implausible after all. In: Perception and Psychophysics. 2008 ; Vol. 70, No. 7. pp. 1327-1334.
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Statistical processing : Not so implausible after all. / Chong, Sang Chul; Sung, Jun Joo; Emmanouil, Tatiana Aloi; Treisman, Anne.

In: Perception and Psychophysics, Vol. 70, No. 7, 01.10.2008, p. 1327-1334.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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