Stroke units and stroke care services in Korea

Hye Yeon Choi, Myoung Jin Cha, Hyo Suk Nam, Young Dae Kim, Keun Sik Hong, Ji Hoe Heo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Organized stroke care systems improve stroke outcomes, but require resources and quality-improvement programs. This study was aimed at understanding the current status of stroke care services and stroke units in Korea. An on-line survey to investigate stroke services was conducted using a structured questionnaire for physicians who were in charge of stroke services or neurology departments of Korean hospitals that had neurology resident training programs. Of the 86 neurology training hospitals in Korea, 67 (78·0%) participated in this study. Brain computed tomography and computed tomography angiography were available 24h a day and seven days a week (24/7) in all hospitals. More than 95% of hospitals offered transcranial Doppler, carotid duplex sonography, echocardiography, and conventional catheter angiography. Intravenous thrombolysis and hemicraniectomy for ischemic brain edema were provided 24/7 in all hospitals, and 50 hospitals (74·6%) were capable of intra-arterial thrombolysis. Stent or angioplasty was more frequently performed than endarterectomy. Performance measures were monitored in 57 hospitals (85·1%). Twenty-nine (43·3%) hospitals had stroke units. Stroke units were more common as the number of beds in the hospital increased (P=0·001). When compared with hospitals without stroke units, stroke coordinators, use of general management protocol and education program for stroke team were more frequently available in the hospitals with stroke units. Most neurology training hospitals in Korea offered competent acute stroke care services. However, stroke units have not been widely implemented. Encouragement and support at the government or national stroke society level would promote the implementation of stroke units with little additional effort.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)336-340
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Stroke
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jun 1

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Korea
Stroke
Neurology
Doppler Duplex Ultrasonography
Education
Endarterectomy
Federal Government
Hospital Departments
Brain Edema
Quality Improvement
Angioplasty
Stents
Echocardiography

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology

Cite this

Choi, Hye Yeon ; Cha, Myoung Jin ; Nam, Hyo Suk ; Kim, Young Dae ; Hong, Keun Sik ; Heo, Ji Hoe. / Stroke units and stroke care services in Korea. In: International Journal of Stroke. 2012 ; Vol. 7, No. 4. pp. 336-340.
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Stroke units and stroke care services in Korea. / Choi, Hye Yeon; Cha, Myoung Jin; Nam, Hyo Suk; Kim, Young Dae; Hong, Keun Sik; Heo, Ji Hoe.

In: International Journal of Stroke, Vol. 7, No. 4, 01.06.2012, p. 336-340.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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