Structure-based functional discovery of proteins: Structural proteomics

Jin W. Jung, Weontae Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The discovery of biochemical and cellular functions of unannotated gene products begins with a database search of proteins with structure/sequence homologues based on known genes. Very recently, a number of frontier groups in structural biology proposed a new paradigm to predict biological functions of an unknown protein on the basis of its three-dimensional structure on a genomic scale. Structural proteomics (genomics), a research area for structure-based functional discovery, aims to complete the protein-folding universe of all gene products in a cell. It would lead us to a complete understanding of a living organism from protein structure. Two major complementary experimental techniques, X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy, combined with recently developed high throughput methods have played a central role in structural proteomics research; however, an integration of these methodologies together with comparative modeling and electron microscopy would speed up the goal for completing a full dictionary of protein folding space in the near future.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)28-34
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Volume37
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2004 Jan 31

Fingerprint

Proteomics
Protein folding
Genes
Protein Folding
Protein Databases
Proteins
X ray crystallography
X Ray Crystallography
Glossaries
Sequence Homology
Genomics
Research
Electron microscopy
Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy
Electron Microscopy
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Throughput

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

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Structure-based functional discovery of proteins : Structural proteomics. / Jung, Jin W.; Lee, Weontae.

In: Journal of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Vol. 37, No. 1, 31.01.2004, p. 28-34.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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