Studies on gasification and melting characteristics of automobile shredder residue

Sung Jin Cho, Hae Young Jung, Yongchil Seo, Woo Hyun Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present technology to handle end-of-life vehicles usually generates about 20-30% of the automobile shredder residue (ASR) of a new car in weight, which is disposed of via landfill or combustion at cement kilns and incinerators. Recently, surveys to compare various techniques such as pyrolysis, gasification, and melting to treat ASR with a better recycling rate have been reported. Gasification and melting processes are operated at high temperatures with the destruction of hazardous components and production of gases, mainly CO and H2, which can be utilized as fuel gas or raw chemicals after cleaning. Also the remaining slag solid portion is stable enough without being hazardous and it can be utilized as recycled material. In this study, ASR sampled from a shredding company was tested in a laboratory-scale gasification and melting process to characterize the gaseous and slag products. At higher temperatures and a lower air equivalent ratio (ER), CO, H2, and CH4 emission increased but CO2 and N2 decreased. C2H6 concentrations changed, but different ERs were not clear. However, there was an increasing tendency of its emission amount at lower temperatures. Carbon conversion efficiency, gas yield (Gy), and CO2 increased with an increasing ER. Thus, when the temperature was higher, Gy and carbon conversion efficiency increased. By-product yield was related to carbon conversion efficiency and Gy. Characteristics of slag produced, such as segregation of metal, leaching property, composition, and surface morphology, were also analyzed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)577-586
Number of pages10
JournalEnvironmental Engineering Science
Volume27
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Jul 1

Fingerprint

Gasification
Automobiles
automobile
Melting
melting
Gases
Slags
Conversion efficiency
slag
Carbon
Carbon Monoxide
gas
carbon
Temperature
Refuse incinerators
Gas fuels
Kilns
Land fill
Leaching
Surface morphology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution

Cite this

Cho, Sung Jin ; Jung, Hae Young ; Seo, Yongchil ; Kim, Woo Hyun. / Studies on gasification and melting characteristics of automobile shredder residue. In: Environmental Engineering Science. 2010 ; Vol. 27, No. 7. pp. 577-586.
@article{c19b34c870ce4ca09f61daf1608391bb,
title = "Studies on gasification and melting characteristics of automobile shredder residue",
abstract = "The present technology to handle end-of-life vehicles usually generates about 20-30{\%} of the automobile shredder residue (ASR) of a new car in weight, which is disposed of via landfill or combustion at cement kilns and incinerators. Recently, surveys to compare various techniques such as pyrolysis, gasification, and melting to treat ASR with a better recycling rate have been reported. Gasification and melting processes are operated at high temperatures with the destruction of hazardous components and production of gases, mainly CO and H2, which can be utilized as fuel gas or raw chemicals after cleaning. Also the remaining slag solid portion is stable enough without being hazardous and it can be utilized as recycled material. In this study, ASR sampled from a shredding company was tested in a laboratory-scale gasification and melting process to characterize the gaseous and slag products. At higher temperatures and a lower air equivalent ratio (ER), CO, H2, and CH4 emission increased but CO2 and N2 decreased. C2H6 concentrations changed, but different ERs were not clear. However, there was an increasing tendency of its emission amount at lower temperatures. Carbon conversion efficiency, gas yield (Gy), and CO2 increased with an increasing ER. Thus, when the temperature was higher, Gy and carbon conversion efficiency increased. By-product yield was related to carbon conversion efficiency and Gy. Characteristics of slag produced, such as segregation of metal, leaching property, composition, and surface morphology, were also analyzed.",
author = "Cho, {Sung Jin} and Jung, {Hae Young} and Yongchil Seo and Kim, {Woo Hyun}",
year = "2010",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1089/ees.2009.0389",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "577--586",
journal = "Environmental Engineering Science",
issn = "1092-8758",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "7",

}

Studies on gasification and melting characteristics of automobile shredder residue. / Cho, Sung Jin; Jung, Hae Young; Seo, Yongchil; Kim, Woo Hyun.

In: Environmental Engineering Science, Vol. 27, No. 7, 01.07.2010, p. 577-586.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Studies on gasification and melting characteristics of automobile shredder residue

AU - Cho, Sung Jin

AU - Jung, Hae Young

AU - Seo, Yongchil

AU - Kim, Woo Hyun

PY - 2010/7/1

Y1 - 2010/7/1

N2 - The present technology to handle end-of-life vehicles usually generates about 20-30% of the automobile shredder residue (ASR) of a new car in weight, which is disposed of via landfill or combustion at cement kilns and incinerators. Recently, surveys to compare various techniques such as pyrolysis, gasification, and melting to treat ASR with a better recycling rate have been reported. Gasification and melting processes are operated at high temperatures with the destruction of hazardous components and production of gases, mainly CO and H2, which can be utilized as fuel gas or raw chemicals after cleaning. Also the remaining slag solid portion is stable enough without being hazardous and it can be utilized as recycled material. In this study, ASR sampled from a shredding company was tested in a laboratory-scale gasification and melting process to characterize the gaseous and slag products. At higher temperatures and a lower air equivalent ratio (ER), CO, H2, and CH4 emission increased but CO2 and N2 decreased. C2H6 concentrations changed, but different ERs were not clear. However, there was an increasing tendency of its emission amount at lower temperatures. Carbon conversion efficiency, gas yield (Gy), and CO2 increased with an increasing ER. Thus, when the temperature was higher, Gy and carbon conversion efficiency increased. By-product yield was related to carbon conversion efficiency and Gy. Characteristics of slag produced, such as segregation of metal, leaching property, composition, and surface morphology, were also analyzed.

AB - The present technology to handle end-of-life vehicles usually generates about 20-30% of the automobile shredder residue (ASR) of a new car in weight, which is disposed of via landfill or combustion at cement kilns and incinerators. Recently, surveys to compare various techniques such as pyrolysis, gasification, and melting to treat ASR with a better recycling rate have been reported. Gasification and melting processes are operated at high temperatures with the destruction of hazardous components and production of gases, mainly CO and H2, which can be utilized as fuel gas or raw chemicals after cleaning. Also the remaining slag solid portion is stable enough without being hazardous and it can be utilized as recycled material. In this study, ASR sampled from a shredding company was tested in a laboratory-scale gasification and melting process to characterize the gaseous and slag products. At higher temperatures and a lower air equivalent ratio (ER), CO, H2, and CH4 emission increased but CO2 and N2 decreased. C2H6 concentrations changed, but different ERs were not clear. However, there was an increasing tendency of its emission amount at lower temperatures. Carbon conversion efficiency, gas yield (Gy), and CO2 increased with an increasing ER. Thus, when the temperature was higher, Gy and carbon conversion efficiency increased. By-product yield was related to carbon conversion efficiency and Gy. Characteristics of slag produced, such as segregation of metal, leaching property, composition, and surface morphology, were also analyzed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77954919615&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77954919615&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/ees.2009.0389

DO - 10.1089/ees.2009.0389

M3 - Article

VL - 27

SP - 577

EP - 586

JO - Environmental Engineering Science

JF - Environmental Engineering Science

SN - 1092-8758

IS - 7

ER -