Surface Localization of Defects in Black TiO2: Enhancing Photoactivity or Reactivity

Kan Zhang, Jong Hyeok Park

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the past several years, surface-disordered TiO2, which is referred to as black TiO2 and can absorb both visible and near-infrared solar light, has triggered an explosion of interest for many important applications. Despite the excellent optical and electrical features of black TiO2 for various photoelectrochemical (PEC) and photochemical reactions, the current understanding of the photocatalytic mechanism is unsatisfactory and incomplete. On the basis of previous studies, we present new insight into the surface localization of defects and perspectives on the liquid/solid interface. The future prospects for understanding black TiO2 from this perspective suggest that defect engineering at the liquid/solid interface is a potential method of guiding nanomaterial design.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)199-207
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Physical Chemistry Letters
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jan 5

Fingerprint

liquid-solid interfaces
reactivity
Defects
Photochemical reactions
defects
Liquids
Nanostructured materials
photochemical reactions
Explosions
explosions
engineering
Infrared radiation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "In the past several years, surface-disordered TiO2, which is referred to as black TiO2 and can absorb both visible and near-infrared solar light, has triggered an explosion of interest for many important applications. Despite the excellent optical and electrical features of black TiO2 for various photoelectrochemical (PEC) and photochemical reactions, the current understanding of the photocatalytic mechanism is unsatisfactory and incomplete. On the basis of previous studies, we present new insight into the surface localization of defects and perspectives on the liquid/solid interface. The future prospects for understanding black TiO2 from this perspective suggest that defect engineering at the liquid/solid interface is a potential method of guiding nanomaterial design.",
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Surface Localization of Defects in Black TiO2 : Enhancing Photoactivity or Reactivity. / Zhang, Kan; Park, Jong Hyeok.

In: Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, Vol. 8, No. 1, 05.01.2017, p. 199-207.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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T1 - Surface Localization of Defects in Black TiO2

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