Swapping inventory between competing firms

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this study, we investigate how competing firms swap inventory. We consider two firms located in two different markets that produce the same type of product. Each firm sells in the two markets. The selling price in each market is determined by the selling quantities of the two firms. We first show that the optimal swapping quantity is zero when firms decide to swap inventory without a sophisticated method. That is, they would not swap inventory. However, under our proposed inventory swapping method, competing firms swap a positive amount of inventory, enabling a higher profit for both firms. We also find that the swapped quantity increases as transportation costs decrease, and swapping inventory may not be beneficial if the transportation cost is either too low or too high. In addition, we investigate how to implement the swapping inventory agreement when the value of the swapped inventory differs by market. We show that firms may prefer to return the physical products to pay the value difference, especially if they are risk-averse.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)26-46
Number of pages21
JournalInternational Journal of Production Economics
Volume199
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 May 1

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Sales
Costs
Profitability
Swaps

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Management Science and Operations Research
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

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abstract = "In this study, we investigate how competing firms swap inventory. We consider two firms located in two different markets that produce the same type of product. Each firm sells in the two markets. The selling price in each market is determined by the selling quantities of the two firms. We first show that the optimal swapping quantity is zero when firms decide to swap inventory without a sophisticated method. That is, they would not swap inventory. However, under our proposed inventory swapping method, competing firms swap a positive amount of inventory, enabling a higher profit for both firms. We also find that the swapped quantity increases as transportation costs decrease, and swapping inventory may not be beneficial if the transportation cost is either too low or too high. In addition, we investigate how to implement the swapping inventory agreement when the value of the swapped inventory differs by market. We show that firms may prefer to return the physical products to pay the value difference, especially if they are risk-averse.",
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Swapping inventory between competing firms. / Park, Seung Jae.

In: International Journal of Production Economics, Vol. 199, 01.05.2018, p. 26-46.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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