Teaching Asia in US secondary school classrooms

A curriculum of othering

Won Pyo Hong, Anne Lise Halvorsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines six US social studies teachers' beliefs and curricular decisions that impact their teaching about Asia. Using interview data, the study seeks to understand the forces that influence what, how, and when teachers teach about Asia in their secondary classes, if and how they position Asians as 'others', and what bearing that has on how these teachers represent Asia in the curriculum. As the study investigates these topics in light of the wider social perceptions of Asia in US society, it uses cultural studies as a major theoretical framework. Major findings show that there is a significant gap between teachers' personal goals for instruction and students' perceptions about Asia, the latter of which are often influenced by mass media and popular culture. The study provides a new perspective on understanding the nature and social function of the school curriculum as producer of the collective perception of other peoples and cultures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)371-393
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Curriculum Studies
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Jun 1

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secondary school
curriculum
classroom
Teaching
teacher
mass culture
media culture
social function
social cognition
social studies
popular culture
cultural studies
mass media
producer
instruction
interview
school
student

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

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Teaching Asia in US secondary school classrooms : A curriculum of othering. / Hong, Won Pyo; Halvorsen, Anne Lise.

In: Journal of Curriculum Studies, Vol. 42, No. 3, 01.06.2010, p. 371-393.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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