Temporal Framing Effects Differ for Narrative Versus Non-Narrative Messages: The Case of Promoting HPV Vaccination

Jarim Kim, Xiaoli Nan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Building upon extant research on temporal framing effect (i.e., relative persuasiveness of present- vs. future-oriented messages), this study investigates whether temporal framing effect differs for narrative versus non-narrative messages in the context of promoting human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among young adults. Results of a controlled experiment (N = 416) indicated that a present-oriented (vs. future-oriented) message led to more favorable attitudes and stronger intentions and perceived vaccine efficacy when the messages were presented in a narrative format, whereas a future-oriented (vs. present-oriented) message resulted in similar attitudes, intentions, and perceived vaccine efficacy when the messages were presented in a non-narrative format. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)401-417
Number of pages17
JournalCommunication Research
Volume46
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Apr 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Communication
  • Linguistics and Language

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