Tethering Growth Factors to Collagen Surfaces Using Copper-Free Click Chemistry: Surface Characterization and in Vitro Biological Response

Hyun Jong Lee, Gabriella M. Fernandes-Cunha, Ilham Putra, Won-Gun Koh, David Myung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Surface modifications with tethered growth factors have mainly been applied to synthetic polymeric biomaterials in well-controlled, acellular settings, followed by seeding with cells. The known bio-orthogonality of copper-free click chemistry provides an opportunity to not only use it in vitro to create scaffolds or pro-migratory tracks in the presence of living cells, but also potentially apply it to living tissues directly as a coupling modality in situ. In this study, we studied the chemical coupling of growth factors to collagen using biocompatible copper-free click chemistry and its effect on the enhancement of growth factor activity in vitro. We verified the characteristics of modified epidermal growth factor (EGF) using mass spectrometry and an EGF/EGF receptor binding assay, and evaluated the chemical immobilization of EGF on collagen by copper-free click chemistry using surface X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found that the anchoring was noncytotoxic, biocompatible, and rapid. Moreover, the surface-immobilized EGF had significant effects on epithelial cell attachment and proliferation. Our results demonstrate the possibility of copper-free click chemistry as a tool for covalent bonding of growth factors to collagen in the presence of living cells. This approach is a novel and potentially clinically useful application of copper-free click chemistry as a way of anchoring growth factors to collagen and foster epithelial wound healing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)23389-23399
Number of pages11
JournalACS Applied Materials and Interfaces
Volume9
Issue number28
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jul 19

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Surface chemistry
Collagen
Copper
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Epidermal Growth Factor
Assays
Cells
Immunosorbents
Surface plasmon resonance
Biocompatible Materials
Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor
Biomaterials
Scaffolds
Mass spectrometry
Surface treatment
X ray photoelectron spectroscopy
Enzymes
Spectroscopy
Tissue

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Lee, Hyun Jong ; Fernandes-Cunha, Gabriella M. ; Putra, Ilham ; Koh, Won-Gun ; Myung, David. / Tethering Growth Factors to Collagen Surfaces Using Copper-Free Click Chemistry : Surface Characterization and in Vitro Biological Response. In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces. 2017 ; Vol. 9, No. 28. pp. 23389-23399.
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Tethering Growth Factors to Collagen Surfaces Using Copper-Free Click Chemistry : Surface Characterization and in Vitro Biological Response. / Lee, Hyun Jong; Fernandes-Cunha, Gabriella M.; Putra, Ilham; Koh, Won-Gun; Myung, David.

In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, Vol. 9, No. 28, 19.07.2017, p. 23389-23399.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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