The addition of nano-sized hydroxyapatite to a sports drink to inhibit dental erosion - In vitro study using bovine enamel

J. H. Min, H. K. Kwon, Baekil Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: This study examined the dental erosion and demineralization potential of a sports drink containing nano-sized hydroxyapatite (nano-HA) as an additive. Methods: The experimental solutions were Powerade (PA) alone and PA with 0.05%, 0.10%, and 0.25% nano-HA. The pH, titratable acidity, and calcium and phosphate content of each solution were analysed, and the degree of saturation with respect to the dental enamel (DS En) was obtained. Twelve sound bovine enamel specimens for each group were treated in accordance with the pH-cycling schedule which had 60 min treatment with experimental solution per day for 7 days. The erosion potential was determined from the changes in surface micro hardness (SMH), the depths of erosion and demineralized layer using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and the morphological changes to the tooth surface were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after pH-cycling. Results: pH and DS En increased with increasing nano-HA concentration in the drinks, whereas the titratable acidity decreased. There were significant differences in the SMH between the PA alone and >0.10% nano-HA groups (p < 0.001). Although the PA alone group showed a pronounced erosion depth, CLSM showed no erosion depth in 0.25% nano-HA group. SEM showed an intact surface with increasing nano-HA concentration in the drinks. In conclusion, dental erosion was effectively prevented with increase of adding concentration of nano-HA, and a sports drink containing 0.25% nano-HA might prevent dental erosion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)629-635
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Dentistry
Volume39
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Jul 1

Fingerprint

Tooth Erosion
Durapatite
Dental Enamel
Sports
Hardness
Confocal Microscopy
Electron Scanning Microscopy
Tooth Demineralization
In Vitro Techniques
Appointments and Schedules
Tooth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

@article{a01756bbc378469faae32ea002960951,
title = "The addition of nano-sized hydroxyapatite to a sports drink to inhibit dental erosion - In vitro study using bovine enamel",
abstract = "Objectives: This study examined the dental erosion and demineralization potential of a sports drink containing nano-sized hydroxyapatite (nano-HA) as an additive. Methods: The experimental solutions were Powerade (PA) alone and PA with 0.05{\%}, 0.10{\%}, and 0.25{\%} nano-HA. The pH, titratable acidity, and calcium and phosphate content of each solution were analysed, and the degree of saturation with respect to the dental enamel (DS En) was obtained. Twelve sound bovine enamel specimens for each group were treated in accordance with the pH-cycling schedule which had 60 min treatment with experimental solution per day for 7 days. The erosion potential was determined from the changes in surface micro hardness (SMH), the depths of erosion and demineralized layer using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and the morphological changes to the tooth surface were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after pH-cycling. Results: pH and DS En increased with increasing nano-HA concentration in the drinks, whereas the titratable acidity decreased. There were significant differences in the SMH between the PA alone and >0.10{\%} nano-HA groups (p < 0.001). Although the PA alone group showed a pronounced erosion depth, CLSM showed no erosion depth in 0.25{\%} nano-HA group. SEM showed an intact surface with increasing nano-HA concentration in the drinks. In conclusion, dental erosion was effectively prevented with increase of adding concentration of nano-HA, and a sports drink containing 0.25{\%} nano-HA might prevent dental erosion.",
author = "Min, {J. H.} and Kwon, {H. K.} and Baekil Kim",
year = "2011",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jdent.2011.07.001",
language = "English",
volume = "39",
pages = "629--635",
journal = "Journal of Dentistry",
issn = "0300-5712",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "9",

}

The addition of nano-sized hydroxyapatite to a sports drink to inhibit dental erosion - In vitro study using bovine enamel. / Min, J. H.; Kwon, H. K.; Kim, Baekil.

In: Journal of Dentistry, Vol. 39, No. 9, 01.07.2011, p. 629-635.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The addition of nano-sized hydroxyapatite to a sports drink to inhibit dental erosion - In vitro study using bovine enamel

AU - Min, J. H.

AU - Kwon, H. K.

AU - Kim, Baekil

PY - 2011/7/1

Y1 - 2011/7/1

N2 - Objectives: This study examined the dental erosion and demineralization potential of a sports drink containing nano-sized hydroxyapatite (nano-HA) as an additive. Methods: The experimental solutions were Powerade (PA) alone and PA with 0.05%, 0.10%, and 0.25% nano-HA. The pH, titratable acidity, and calcium and phosphate content of each solution were analysed, and the degree of saturation with respect to the dental enamel (DS En) was obtained. Twelve sound bovine enamel specimens for each group were treated in accordance with the pH-cycling schedule which had 60 min treatment with experimental solution per day for 7 days. The erosion potential was determined from the changes in surface micro hardness (SMH), the depths of erosion and demineralized layer using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and the morphological changes to the tooth surface were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after pH-cycling. Results: pH and DS En increased with increasing nano-HA concentration in the drinks, whereas the titratable acidity decreased. There were significant differences in the SMH between the PA alone and >0.10% nano-HA groups (p < 0.001). Although the PA alone group showed a pronounced erosion depth, CLSM showed no erosion depth in 0.25% nano-HA group. SEM showed an intact surface with increasing nano-HA concentration in the drinks. In conclusion, dental erosion was effectively prevented with increase of adding concentration of nano-HA, and a sports drink containing 0.25% nano-HA might prevent dental erosion.

AB - Objectives: This study examined the dental erosion and demineralization potential of a sports drink containing nano-sized hydroxyapatite (nano-HA) as an additive. Methods: The experimental solutions were Powerade (PA) alone and PA with 0.05%, 0.10%, and 0.25% nano-HA. The pH, titratable acidity, and calcium and phosphate content of each solution were analysed, and the degree of saturation with respect to the dental enamel (DS En) was obtained. Twelve sound bovine enamel specimens for each group were treated in accordance with the pH-cycling schedule which had 60 min treatment with experimental solution per day for 7 days. The erosion potential was determined from the changes in surface micro hardness (SMH), the depths of erosion and demineralized layer using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and the morphological changes to the tooth surface were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after pH-cycling. Results: pH and DS En increased with increasing nano-HA concentration in the drinks, whereas the titratable acidity decreased. There were significant differences in the SMH between the PA alone and >0.10% nano-HA groups (p < 0.001). Although the PA alone group showed a pronounced erosion depth, CLSM showed no erosion depth in 0.25% nano-HA group. SEM showed an intact surface with increasing nano-HA concentration in the drinks. In conclusion, dental erosion was effectively prevented with increase of adding concentration of nano-HA, and a sports drink containing 0.25% nano-HA might prevent dental erosion.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80051474911&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80051474911&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jdent.2011.07.001

DO - 10.1016/j.jdent.2011.07.001

M3 - Article

C2 - 21763390

AN - SCOPUS:80051474911

VL - 39

SP - 629

EP - 635

JO - Journal of Dentistry

JF - Journal of Dentistry

SN - 0300-5712

IS - 9

ER -