The association between intimate partner violence onset and gender-specific depression: A longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample

Sarah Soyeon Oh, Woorim Kim, Sung In Jang, Eun Cheol Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious social problem that is often hidden, unnoticed or ignored. However, few studies have explored the effects of partner violence onset and/or persistence on the mental health of individuals. Thus, we aimed to investigate the association between IPV onset and depressive symptoms in both married men and women. Methods: In this study, nationally representative data from the Korea Welfare Panel Study were employed to track 1040 men and 3732 women for a period of six years (2010–2015). Depressive symptoms were scored according to the 11-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D-11). Results: Of our study population, 415 men (39.9%) and 866 women (23.2%) suffered from continuous intimate partner violence, meaning that they reported experience of IPV in both the previous and current year of investigation. Such subjects had significantly higher CES-D-11 scores (men β: 1.745, p ≤ 0001; women β: 1.970, p ≤ 0001) as did subjects whose partners turned violent from non-violent (men β: 1.623, p ≤ 0001; women β: 1.594, p ≤ 0001) than those with continuously non-violent partners (reference group). Subjects whose partners turned non-violent from violent continued to be more depressed (men β: 0.312, p ≤ 009; women β: 0.880, p ≤ 000) than those with continuously non-violent partners. Through subgroup analysis, we also found that lower SES, as a covariate relative to educational attainment, household income, and economic status, was associated with worsened depression following IPV onset. Unemployed women with consistently violent partners (β: 2.957, p ≤.0001) and unemployed men with newly violent partners (β: 3.010, p ≤.0001) were more depressed than the employed or self-employed. Conclusion: Our findings reveal that continuous IPV, as well as its onset, can have serious consequences for the mental health of its victims.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)79-84
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of affective disorders
Volume250
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 May 1

Fingerprint

Longitudinal Studies
Depression
Mental Health
Social Problems
Korea
Intimate Partner Violence
Violence
Epidemiologic Studies
Economics
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

@article{7cc4657a14434a9c888e04f800512c09,
title = "The association between intimate partner violence onset and gender-specific depression: A longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample",
abstract = "Background: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious social problem that is often hidden, unnoticed or ignored. However, few studies have explored the effects of partner violence onset and/or persistence on the mental health of individuals. Thus, we aimed to investigate the association between IPV onset and depressive symptoms in both married men and women. Methods: In this study, nationally representative data from the Korea Welfare Panel Study were employed to track 1040 men and 3732 women for a period of six years (2010–2015). Depressive symptoms were scored according to the 11-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D-11). Results: Of our study population, 415 men (39.9{\%}) and 866 women (23.2{\%}) suffered from continuous intimate partner violence, meaning that they reported experience of IPV in both the previous and current year of investigation. Such subjects had significantly higher CES-D-11 scores (men β: 1.745, p ≤ 0001; women β: 1.970, p ≤ 0001) as did subjects whose partners turned violent from non-violent (men β: 1.623, p ≤ 0001; women β: 1.594, p ≤ 0001) than those with continuously non-violent partners (reference group). Subjects whose partners turned non-violent from violent continued to be more depressed (men β: 0.312, p ≤ 009; women β: 0.880, p ≤ 000) than those with continuously non-violent partners. Through subgroup analysis, we also found that lower SES, as a covariate relative to educational attainment, household income, and economic status, was associated with worsened depression following IPV onset. Unemployed women with consistently violent partners (β: 2.957, p ≤.0001) and unemployed men with newly violent partners (β: 3.010, p ≤.0001) were more depressed than the employed or self-employed. Conclusion: Our findings reveal that continuous IPV, as well as its onset, can have serious consequences for the mental health of its victims.",
author = "Oh, {Sarah Soyeon} and Woorim Kim and Jang, {Sung In} and Park, {Eun Cheol}",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jad.2019.02.065",
language = "English",
volume = "250",
pages = "79--84",
journal = "Journal of Affective Disorders",
issn = "0165-0327",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

The association between intimate partner violence onset and gender-specific depression : A longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample. / Oh, Sarah Soyeon; Kim, Woorim; Jang, Sung In; Park, Eun Cheol.

In: Journal of affective disorders, Vol. 250, 01.05.2019, p. 79-84.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The association between intimate partner violence onset and gender-specific depression

T2 - A longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample

AU - Oh, Sarah Soyeon

AU - Kim, Woorim

AU - Jang, Sung In

AU - Park, Eun Cheol

PY - 2019/5/1

Y1 - 2019/5/1

N2 - Background: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious social problem that is often hidden, unnoticed or ignored. However, few studies have explored the effects of partner violence onset and/or persistence on the mental health of individuals. Thus, we aimed to investigate the association between IPV onset and depressive symptoms in both married men and women. Methods: In this study, nationally representative data from the Korea Welfare Panel Study were employed to track 1040 men and 3732 women for a period of six years (2010–2015). Depressive symptoms were scored according to the 11-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D-11). Results: Of our study population, 415 men (39.9%) and 866 women (23.2%) suffered from continuous intimate partner violence, meaning that they reported experience of IPV in both the previous and current year of investigation. Such subjects had significantly higher CES-D-11 scores (men β: 1.745, p ≤ 0001; women β: 1.970, p ≤ 0001) as did subjects whose partners turned violent from non-violent (men β: 1.623, p ≤ 0001; women β: 1.594, p ≤ 0001) than those with continuously non-violent partners (reference group). Subjects whose partners turned non-violent from violent continued to be more depressed (men β: 0.312, p ≤ 009; women β: 0.880, p ≤ 000) than those with continuously non-violent partners. Through subgroup analysis, we also found that lower SES, as a covariate relative to educational attainment, household income, and economic status, was associated with worsened depression following IPV onset. Unemployed women with consistently violent partners (β: 2.957, p ≤.0001) and unemployed men with newly violent partners (β: 3.010, p ≤.0001) were more depressed than the employed or self-employed. Conclusion: Our findings reveal that continuous IPV, as well as its onset, can have serious consequences for the mental health of its victims.

AB - Background: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious social problem that is often hidden, unnoticed or ignored. However, few studies have explored the effects of partner violence onset and/or persistence on the mental health of individuals. Thus, we aimed to investigate the association between IPV onset and depressive symptoms in both married men and women. Methods: In this study, nationally representative data from the Korea Welfare Panel Study were employed to track 1040 men and 3732 women for a period of six years (2010–2015). Depressive symptoms were scored according to the 11-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D-11). Results: Of our study population, 415 men (39.9%) and 866 women (23.2%) suffered from continuous intimate partner violence, meaning that they reported experience of IPV in both the previous and current year of investigation. Such subjects had significantly higher CES-D-11 scores (men β: 1.745, p ≤ 0001; women β: 1.970, p ≤ 0001) as did subjects whose partners turned violent from non-violent (men β: 1.623, p ≤ 0001; women β: 1.594, p ≤ 0001) than those with continuously non-violent partners (reference group). Subjects whose partners turned non-violent from violent continued to be more depressed (men β: 0.312, p ≤ 009; women β: 0.880, p ≤ 000) than those with continuously non-violent partners. Through subgroup analysis, we also found that lower SES, as a covariate relative to educational attainment, household income, and economic status, was associated with worsened depression following IPV onset. Unemployed women with consistently violent partners (β: 2.957, p ≤.0001) and unemployed men with newly violent partners (β: 3.010, p ≤.0001) were more depressed than the employed or self-employed. Conclusion: Our findings reveal that continuous IPV, as well as its onset, can have serious consequences for the mental health of its victims.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85062263040&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85062263040&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jad.2019.02.065

DO - 10.1016/j.jad.2019.02.065

M3 - Article

C2 - 30836283

AN - SCOPUS:85062263040

VL - 250

SP - 79

EP - 84

JO - Journal of Affective Disorders

JF - Journal of Affective Disorders

SN - 0165-0327

ER -