The association between low blood lead levels and the prevalence of prehypertension among nonhypertensive adults in Korea

Wanhyung Lee, JinHa Yoon, Jaehoon Roh, Seunghyun Lee, Hongdeok Seok, June Hee Lee, Pil Kyun Jung, Jeongbae Rhie, Jong Uk Won

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Low-level lead exposure has been associated with increases in blood pressure (BP) and impairment of the cardiovascular system. Prehypertension is not categorized as a disease currently; however, individuals with untreated prehypertension are known to be at increased risk of progression to hypertension and mortality caused by cardiovascular disease. We investigated the association between blood lead levels below the threshold for the harmful effects of lead and the prevalence of prehypertension in Korean adults.

METHODS: A total of 8,493 participants (3,945 men and 4,548 women) were included in the current analysis, using data from the fourth, fifth, and sixth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) in 2007-2013. Blood analysis, self-report questionnaires, and physical examinations were used to assess blood lead levels, BP, and medical history. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for prehypertension were calculated using multiple logistic regression models.

RESULTS: Compared to the first quartile (Q1) blood lead level (0.206-1.539 μg/dl), the ORs (95% CI) were 1.24 (1.04-1.48) in Q2, (1.540-2.056 μg/dl), 1.27 (1.06-1.52) in Q3, (2.057-2.716 μg/dl), and 1.30 (1.07-1.60) in Q4 (2.717-24.532 μg/dl) for the prevalence of prehypertension after adjusting for age, sex, morbidity status, socioeconomic status, and health behavioral variables.

CONCLUSIONS: Our large, cross-sectional, nationwide study revealed that blood lead levels below the threshold for the harmful effects of lead were significantly associated with prehypertension. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 28:729-735, 2016.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)729-735
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican journal of human biology : the official journal of the Human Biology Council
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Sep 10

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Prehypertension
Korea
Korean Peninsula
confidence
blood
Disease
examination
hypertension
health
cross-sectional study
morbidity
nutrition
social status
data analysis
mortality
logistics
blood pressure
confidence interval
regression
questionnaire

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anatomy
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Anthropology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Lee, Wanhyung ; Yoon, JinHa ; Roh, Jaehoon ; Lee, Seunghyun ; Seok, Hongdeok ; Lee, June Hee ; Jung, Pil Kyun ; Rhie, Jeongbae ; Won, Jong Uk. / The association between low blood lead levels and the prevalence of prehypertension among nonhypertensive adults in Korea. In: American journal of human biology : the official journal of the Human Biology Council. 2016 ; Vol. 28, No. 5. pp. 729-735.
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title = "The association between low blood lead levels and the prevalence of prehypertension among nonhypertensive adults in Korea",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: Low-level lead exposure has been associated with increases in blood pressure (BP) and impairment of the cardiovascular system. Prehypertension is not categorized as a disease currently; however, individuals with untreated prehypertension are known to be at increased risk of progression to hypertension and mortality caused by cardiovascular disease. We investigated the association between blood lead levels below the threshold for the harmful effects of lead and the prevalence of prehypertension in Korean adults.METHODS: A total of 8,493 participants (3,945 men and 4,548 women) were included in the current analysis, using data from the fourth, fifth, and sixth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) in 2007-2013. Blood analysis, self-report questionnaires, and physical examinations were used to assess blood lead levels, BP, and medical history. Odds ratios (OR) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (95{\%} CI) for prehypertension were calculated using multiple logistic regression models.RESULTS: Compared to the first quartile (Q1) blood lead level (0.206-1.539 μg/dl), the ORs (95{\%} CI) were 1.24 (1.04-1.48) in Q2, (1.540-2.056 μg/dl), 1.27 (1.06-1.52) in Q3, (2.057-2.716 μg/dl), and 1.30 (1.07-1.60) in Q4 (2.717-24.532 μg/dl) for the prevalence of prehypertension after adjusting for age, sex, morbidity status, socioeconomic status, and health behavioral variables.CONCLUSIONS: Our large, cross-sectional, nationwide study revealed that blood lead levels below the threshold for the harmful effects of lead were significantly associated with prehypertension. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 28:729-735, 2016.",
author = "Wanhyung Lee and JinHa Yoon and Jaehoon Roh and Seunghyun Lee and Hongdeok Seok and Lee, {June Hee} and Jung, {Pil Kyun} and Jeongbae Rhie and Won, {Jong Uk}",
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The association between low blood lead levels and the prevalence of prehypertension among nonhypertensive adults in Korea. / Lee, Wanhyung; Yoon, JinHa; Roh, Jaehoon; Lee, Seunghyun; Seok, Hongdeok; Lee, June Hee; Jung, Pil Kyun; Rhie, Jeongbae; Won, Jong Uk.

In: American journal of human biology : the official journal of the Human Biology Council, Vol. 28, No. 5, 10.09.2016, p. 729-735.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The association between low blood lead levels and the prevalence of prehypertension among nonhypertensive adults in Korea

AU - Lee, Wanhyung

AU - Yoon, JinHa

AU - Roh, Jaehoon

AU - Lee, Seunghyun

AU - Seok, Hongdeok

AU - Lee, June Hee

AU - Jung, Pil Kyun

AU - Rhie, Jeongbae

AU - Won, Jong Uk

PY - 2016/9/10

Y1 - 2016/9/10

N2 - OBJECTIVES: Low-level lead exposure has been associated with increases in blood pressure (BP) and impairment of the cardiovascular system. Prehypertension is not categorized as a disease currently; however, individuals with untreated prehypertension are known to be at increased risk of progression to hypertension and mortality caused by cardiovascular disease. We investigated the association between blood lead levels below the threshold for the harmful effects of lead and the prevalence of prehypertension in Korean adults.METHODS: A total of 8,493 participants (3,945 men and 4,548 women) were included in the current analysis, using data from the fourth, fifth, and sixth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) in 2007-2013. Blood analysis, self-report questionnaires, and physical examinations were used to assess blood lead levels, BP, and medical history. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for prehypertension were calculated using multiple logistic regression models.RESULTS: Compared to the first quartile (Q1) blood lead level (0.206-1.539 μg/dl), the ORs (95% CI) were 1.24 (1.04-1.48) in Q2, (1.540-2.056 μg/dl), 1.27 (1.06-1.52) in Q3, (2.057-2.716 μg/dl), and 1.30 (1.07-1.60) in Q4 (2.717-24.532 μg/dl) for the prevalence of prehypertension after adjusting for age, sex, morbidity status, socioeconomic status, and health behavioral variables.CONCLUSIONS: Our large, cross-sectional, nationwide study revealed that blood lead levels below the threshold for the harmful effects of lead were significantly associated with prehypertension. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 28:729-735, 2016.

AB - OBJECTIVES: Low-level lead exposure has been associated with increases in blood pressure (BP) and impairment of the cardiovascular system. Prehypertension is not categorized as a disease currently; however, individuals with untreated prehypertension are known to be at increased risk of progression to hypertension and mortality caused by cardiovascular disease. We investigated the association between blood lead levels below the threshold for the harmful effects of lead and the prevalence of prehypertension in Korean adults.METHODS: A total of 8,493 participants (3,945 men and 4,548 women) were included in the current analysis, using data from the fourth, fifth, and sixth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) in 2007-2013. Blood analysis, self-report questionnaires, and physical examinations were used to assess blood lead levels, BP, and medical history. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for prehypertension were calculated using multiple logistic regression models.RESULTS: Compared to the first quartile (Q1) blood lead level (0.206-1.539 μg/dl), the ORs (95% CI) were 1.24 (1.04-1.48) in Q2, (1.540-2.056 μg/dl), 1.27 (1.06-1.52) in Q3, (2.057-2.716 μg/dl), and 1.30 (1.07-1.60) in Q4 (2.717-24.532 μg/dl) for the prevalence of prehypertension after adjusting for age, sex, morbidity status, socioeconomic status, and health behavioral variables.CONCLUSIONS: Our large, cross-sectional, nationwide study revealed that blood lead levels below the threshold for the harmful effects of lead were significantly associated with prehypertension. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 28:729-735, 2016.

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