The association between low frequency of having breakfast and dyslipidemia in South Korean men and women

Doo Woong Lee, Dong Woo Choi, Yeong Jun Ju, Sang Ah Lee, Eun Cheol Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background/Objectives: This study investigated the association between frequency of having breakfast and dyslipidemia in South Korean adults aged 30 or over. Subjects/Methods: This study, including 10,874 participants, was based on the Seventh Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted between 2013 and 2016. Using multiple logistic regression analysis, we examined the associations between frequency of having breakfast (and other covariates) and dyslipidemia in men and women. Results: Dyslipidemia was more common among male participants with lower frequency of having breakfast in a week and was significantly high in “0 times a week” group (OR = 1.42, 95% CI, 1.13–1.78) compared with 5–7 times/week. This trend was observed in those aged 40–59 years, white collar workers, those living with their spouse, and overweight or obese participants among males and in females aged 40–49 and ≥ 60 years. Statistically significant tendency of having dyslipidemia was observed with decreasing frequency of having breakfast in total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and triglycerides in males (LDL-C: p for trend < 0.0001, TG: p for trend = 0.0004), but not in females. Conclusion: Frequency of having breakfast was associated with reduced dyslipidemia rate. The risk of dyslipidemia with a low frequency of breakfast was particularly observed in males aged 40–59, white collar workers, those living with a spouse, and postmenopausal females aged ≥ 60.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)896-904
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume73
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jun 1

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Breakfast
Dyslipidemias
Spouses
LDL Cholesterol
Nutrition Surveys
Korea
Logistic Models
Cholesterol
Regression Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Lee, Doo Woong ; Choi, Dong Woo ; Ju, Yeong Jun ; Lee, Sang Ah ; Park, Eun Cheol. / The association between low frequency of having breakfast and dyslipidemia in South Korean men and women. In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2019 ; Vol. 73, No. 6. pp. 896-904.
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The association between low frequency of having breakfast and dyslipidemia in South Korean men and women. / Lee, Doo Woong; Choi, Dong Woo; Ju, Yeong Jun; Lee, Sang Ah; Park, Eun Cheol.

In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 73, No. 6, 01.06.2019, p. 896-904.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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