The association between low level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and mood disorder using time-dependent analysis

Seung Ju Kim, Kyu Tae Han, Suk Yong Jang, Euncheol Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Although many studies have identified factors associated with mood disorder, the association between high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and mood disorder is still controversial. The aim of our study was to evaluate the association between low HDL-C and onset of mood disorder in Korea based on different cut-off levels. Methods We used National Health Examinations Service cohort data from 2009 to 2013. We used time-dependent Cox regression analysis to evaluate the association between low level of HDL-C and onset of mood disorder. Hazard ratios (HRs) for onset of mood disorder were estimated for 1- to 2-year time intervals, starting at the first health examination and accounting for the duration until the next health examination. Results A total of 400,803 participants (male: 220,573; female: 180,230) were included in our study. A total of 4576 (2.07%) males and 7598 (4.22%) females developed mood disorder. Based on dyslipidemia (< 40 mg/dL), low level of HDL-C was associated with the risk of mood disorder in both male and female, however, only females showed statistically significant (HR: 1.097, 95% CI: 1.012–1.189). Based on quartile-based approach, females with low levels of HDL-C (< 47 mg/dL) and males with high levels of HDL-C (≥ 59 mg/dL) were associated with subsequent risk of mood disorder. Conclusions Our findings suggest that level of HDL-C is associated with potential risk factors in mood disorder. However, a flexible threshold value in HDL-C level would be needed to evaluate the subsequent risk of mood disorder. Thus, further studies are needed to help improve the mental health in susceptible individuals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)317-325
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume225
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jan 1

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Mood Disorders
HDL Cholesterol
Health
National Health Programs
Korea
Dyslipidemias
LDL Cholesterol
Mental Health
Regression Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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title = "The association between low level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and mood disorder using time-dependent analysis",
abstract = "Background Although many studies have identified factors associated with mood disorder, the association between high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and mood disorder is still controversial. The aim of our study was to evaluate the association between low HDL-C and onset of mood disorder in Korea based on different cut-off levels. Methods We used National Health Examinations Service cohort data from 2009 to 2013. We used time-dependent Cox regression analysis to evaluate the association between low level of HDL-C and onset of mood disorder. Hazard ratios (HRs) for onset of mood disorder were estimated for 1- to 2-year time intervals, starting at the first health examination and accounting for the duration until the next health examination. Results A total of 400,803 participants (male: 220,573; female: 180,230) were included in our study. A total of 4576 (2.07{\%}) males and 7598 (4.22{\%}) females developed mood disorder. Based on dyslipidemia (< 40 mg/dL), low level of HDL-C was associated with the risk of mood disorder in both male and female, however, only females showed statistically significant (HR: 1.097, 95{\%} CI: 1.012–1.189). Based on quartile-based approach, females with low levels of HDL-C (< 47 mg/dL) and males with high levels of HDL-C (≥ 59 mg/dL) were associated with subsequent risk of mood disorder. Conclusions Our findings suggest that level of HDL-C is associated with potential risk factors in mood disorder. However, a flexible threshold value in HDL-C level would be needed to evaluate the subsequent risk of mood disorder. Thus, further studies are needed to help improve the mental health in susceptible individuals.",
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The association between low level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and mood disorder using time-dependent analysis. / Kim, Seung Ju; Han, Kyu Tae; Jang, Suk Yong; Park, Euncheol.

In: Journal of Affective Disorders, Vol. 225, 01.01.2018, p. 317-325.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Kim, Seung Ju

AU - Han, Kyu Tae

AU - Jang, Suk Yong

AU - Park, Euncheol

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N2 - Background Although many studies have identified factors associated with mood disorder, the association between high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and mood disorder is still controversial. The aim of our study was to evaluate the association between low HDL-C and onset of mood disorder in Korea based on different cut-off levels. Methods We used National Health Examinations Service cohort data from 2009 to 2013. We used time-dependent Cox regression analysis to evaluate the association between low level of HDL-C and onset of mood disorder. Hazard ratios (HRs) for onset of mood disorder were estimated for 1- to 2-year time intervals, starting at the first health examination and accounting for the duration until the next health examination. Results A total of 400,803 participants (male: 220,573; female: 180,230) were included in our study. A total of 4576 (2.07%) males and 7598 (4.22%) females developed mood disorder. Based on dyslipidemia (< 40 mg/dL), low level of HDL-C was associated with the risk of mood disorder in both male and female, however, only females showed statistically significant (HR: 1.097, 95% CI: 1.012–1.189). Based on quartile-based approach, females with low levels of HDL-C (< 47 mg/dL) and males with high levels of HDL-C (≥ 59 mg/dL) were associated with subsequent risk of mood disorder. Conclusions Our findings suggest that level of HDL-C is associated with potential risk factors in mood disorder. However, a flexible threshold value in HDL-C level would be needed to evaluate the subsequent risk of mood disorder. Thus, further studies are needed to help improve the mental health in susceptible individuals.

AB - Background Although many studies have identified factors associated with mood disorder, the association between high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and mood disorder is still controversial. The aim of our study was to evaluate the association between low HDL-C and onset of mood disorder in Korea based on different cut-off levels. Methods We used National Health Examinations Service cohort data from 2009 to 2013. We used time-dependent Cox regression analysis to evaluate the association between low level of HDL-C and onset of mood disorder. Hazard ratios (HRs) for onset of mood disorder were estimated for 1- to 2-year time intervals, starting at the first health examination and accounting for the duration until the next health examination. Results A total of 400,803 participants (male: 220,573; female: 180,230) were included in our study. A total of 4576 (2.07%) males and 7598 (4.22%) females developed mood disorder. Based on dyslipidemia (< 40 mg/dL), low level of HDL-C was associated with the risk of mood disorder in both male and female, however, only females showed statistically significant (HR: 1.097, 95% CI: 1.012–1.189). Based on quartile-based approach, females with low levels of HDL-C (< 47 mg/dL) and males with high levels of HDL-C (≥ 59 mg/dL) were associated with subsequent risk of mood disorder. Conclusions Our findings suggest that level of HDL-C is associated with potential risk factors in mood disorder. However, a flexible threshold value in HDL-C level would be needed to evaluate the subsequent risk of mood disorder. Thus, further studies are needed to help improve the mental health in susceptible individuals.

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