The Association Between Quality of Care and Quality of Life in Long-Stay Nursing Home Residents With Preserved Cognition

Sun Jung Kim, Euncheol Park, Sulgi Kim, Shunichi Nakagawa, John Lung, Jong Bum Choi, Woo Sang Ryu, Too Jae Min, Hyun Phil Shin, Kyudam Kim, Ji Won Yoo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To assess the overall quality of life of long-stay nursing home residents with preserved cognition, to examine whether the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Service's Nursing Home Compare 5-star quality rating system reflects the overall quality of life of such residents, and to examine whether residents' demographics and clinical characteristics affect their quality of life. Design/measurements: Quality of life was measured using the Participant Outcomes and Status Measures-Nursing Facility survey, which has 10 sections and 63 items. Total scores range from 20 (lowest possible quality of life) to 100 (highest). Setting/participants: Long-stay nursing home residents with preserved cognition (n = 316) were interviewed. Results: The average quality- of-life score was 71.4 (SD: 7.6; range: 45.1-93.0). Multilevel regression models revealed that quality of life was associated with physical impairment (parameter estimate = -0.728; P = 04) and depression (parameter estimate = -3.015; P =01) but not Nursing Home Compare's overall star rating (parameter estimate = 0.683; P =12) and not pain (parameter estimate = -0.705; P =47). Conclusion: The 5-star quality rating system did not reflect the quality of life of long-stay nursing home residents with preserved cognition. Notably, pain was not associated with quality of life, but physical impairment and depression were.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)220-225
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Medical Directors Association
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Quality of Health Care
Nursing Homes
Cognition
Quality of Life
Depression
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (U.S.)
Pain
Nursing
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)
  • Health Policy
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Kim, Sun Jung ; Park, Euncheol ; Kim, Sulgi ; Nakagawa, Shunichi ; Lung, John ; Choi, Jong Bum ; Ryu, Woo Sang ; Min, Too Jae ; Shin, Hyun Phil ; Kim, Kyudam ; Yoo, Ji Won. / The Association Between Quality of Care and Quality of Life in Long-Stay Nursing Home Residents With Preserved Cognition. In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association. 2014 ; Vol. 15, No. 3. pp. 220-225.
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The Association Between Quality of Care and Quality of Life in Long-Stay Nursing Home Residents With Preserved Cognition. / Kim, Sun Jung; Park, Euncheol; Kim, Sulgi; Nakagawa, Shunichi; Lung, John; Choi, Jong Bum; Ryu, Woo Sang; Min, Too Jae; Shin, Hyun Phil; Kim, Kyudam; Yoo, Ji Won.

In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, Vol. 15, No. 3, 01.01.2014, p. 220-225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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