The change in the nationwide seroprevalence of hepatitis C virus and the status of linkage to care in South Korea from 2009 to 2015

The Korean hepatitis epidemiology study group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) requires epidemiological monitoring to estimate its disease burden and to develop countermeasures. This study aimed to investigate the difference between the 2015 and 2009 nationwide anti-HCV seroprevalence and to determine linkage to care estimates in South Korea. Methods: A total 268,422 examinees ≥ 20 years old were included in 2015 from 33 medical institutions nationwide. Electronically extracted data were retrospectively analyzed to calculate the age-, sex-, and area-adjusted anti-HCV prevalence. Seroprevalence in 2015 was measured using the same method as that in 2009. For anti-HCV-positive subjects, medical records were reviewed to see whether HCV RNA testing or antiviral treatment was performed. Results: Adjusted anti-HCV prevalence was 0.60% (95% confidence interval, 0.57–0.63) based on general Korean population in 2015. It showed an increasing trend according to age; 0.23% in thirties, 0.38% in forties, 0.63% in fifties, 1.08% in sixties, and 1.65% in those aged ≥ 70 years. From 2009 to 2015, the adjusted anti-HCV prevalence decreased by 30%, with odds ratio of 0.70 (95% CI 0.70–0.71). There was significant intranational regional variation and changing pattern of seroprevalence. Among 1359 anti-HCV-positive subjects, HCV RNA test was performed in 60% and 25.4% had positivity. Treatment-initiated and cured rates in 2015 were 18.5% and 10.9%, respectively. Conclusions: Anti-HCV prevalence in South Korea was 0.6% in 2015, showing a 30% decrease from that in 2009. Although the HCV RNA testing rate was increased since 2009, this remains suboptimal. Moreover, the treatment uptake rate should be improved in South Korea.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)599-608
Number of pages10
JournalHepatology International
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Sep 1

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Republic of Korea
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Hepacivirus
RNA
Epidemiological Monitoring
Medical Records
Antiviral Agents
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hepatology

Cite this

@article{db21b778c41d4f1c84fcc97e8505a215,
title = "The change in the nationwide seroprevalence of hepatitis C virus and the status of linkage to care in South Korea from 2009 to 2015",
abstract = "Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) requires epidemiological monitoring to estimate its disease burden and to develop countermeasures. This study aimed to investigate the difference between the 2015 and 2009 nationwide anti-HCV seroprevalence and to determine linkage to care estimates in South Korea. Methods: A total 268,422 examinees ≥ 20 years old were included in 2015 from 33 medical institutions nationwide. Electronically extracted data were retrospectively analyzed to calculate the age-, sex-, and area-adjusted anti-HCV prevalence. Seroprevalence in 2015 was measured using the same method as that in 2009. For anti-HCV-positive subjects, medical records were reviewed to see whether HCV RNA testing or antiviral treatment was performed. Results: Adjusted anti-HCV prevalence was 0.60{\%} (95{\%} confidence interval, 0.57–0.63) based on general Korean population in 2015. It showed an increasing trend according to age; 0.23{\%} in thirties, 0.38{\%} in forties, 0.63{\%} in fifties, 1.08{\%} in sixties, and 1.65{\%} in those aged ≥ 70 years. From 2009 to 2015, the adjusted anti-HCV prevalence decreased by 30{\%}, with odds ratio of 0.70 (95{\%} CI 0.70–0.71). There was significant intranational regional variation and changing pattern of seroprevalence. Among 1359 anti-HCV-positive subjects, HCV RNA test was performed in 60{\%} and 25.4{\%} had positivity. Treatment-initiated and cured rates in 2015 were 18.5{\%} and 10.9{\%}, respectively. Conclusions: Anti-HCV prevalence in South Korea was 0.6{\%} in 2015, showing a 30{\%} decrease from that in 2009. Although the HCV RNA testing rate was increased since 2009, this remains suboptimal. Moreover, the treatment uptake rate should be improved in South Korea.",
author = "{The Korean hepatitis epidemiology study group} and Jang, {Eun Sun} and Moran Ki and Choi, {Hwa Young} and Kim, {Kyung Ah} and Jeong, {Sook Hyang} and Kim, {Gi Ae} and Kim, {Do Young} and Kim, {Dong Joon} and Kim, {Man Woo} and Kim, {Sung Eun} and Kim, {Yun Soo} and Kim, {Young Seok} and Kim, {In Hee} and Kim, {Chang Wook} and Kim, {Ho Dong} and Kim, {Hyung Joon} and Park, {Neung Hwa} and Baik, {Soon Koo} and Suh, {Jeong Ill} and Song, {Byung Cheol} and Song, {Il Han} and Yeon, {Jong Eun} and Lee, {Byung Seok} and Lee, {Youn Jae} and Jung, {Young Kul} and Chung, {Woo Jin} and Cho, {Sung Bum} and Cho, {Eun Young} and Cho, {Hyun Chin} and Cheon, {Gab Jin} and Chae, {Hee Bok} and Choi, {Dae Hee} and Choi, {Sung Kyu} and Tak, {Won Young} and Jeong Heo and Jeong, {Sook Hyang}",
year = "2019",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s12072-019-09975-y",
language = "English",
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pages = "599--608",
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}

The change in the nationwide seroprevalence of hepatitis C virus and the status of linkage to care in South Korea from 2009 to 2015. / The Korean hepatitis epidemiology study group.

In: Hepatology International, Vol. 13, No. 5, 01.09.2019, p. 599-608.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The change in the nationwide seroprevalence of hepatitis C virus and the status of linkage to care in South Korea from 2009 to 2015

AU - The Korean hepatitis epidemiology study group

AU - Jang, Eun Sun

AU - Ki, Moran

AU - Choi, Hwa Young

AU - Kim, Kyung Ah

AU - Jeong, Sook Hyang

AU - Kim, Gi Ae

AU - Kim, Do Young

AU - Kim, Dong Joon

AU - Kim, Man Woo

AU - Kim, Sung Eun

AU - Kim, Yun Soo

AU - Kim, Young Seok

AU - Kim, In Hee

AU - Kim, Chang Wook

AU - Kim, Ho Dong

AU - Kim, Hyung Joon

AU - Park, Neung Hwa

AU - Baik, Soon Koo

AU - Suh, Jeong Ill

AU - Song, Byung Cheol

AU - Song, Il Han

AU - Yeon, Jong Eun

AU - Lee, Byung Seok

AU - Lee, Youn Jae

AU - Jung, Young Kul

AU - Chung, Woo Jin

AU - Cho, Sung Bum

AU - Cho, Eun Young

AU - Cho, Hyun Chin

AU - Cheon, Gab Jin

AU - Chae, Hee Bok

AU - Choi, Dae Hee

AU - Choi, Sung Kyu

AU - Tak, Won Young

AU - Heo, Jeong

AU - Jeong, Sook Hyang

PY - 2019/9/1

Y1 - 2019/9/1

N2 - Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) requires epidemiological monitoring to estimate its disease burden and to develop countermeasures. This study aimed to investigate the difference between the 2015 and 2009 nationwide anti-HCV seroprevalence and to determine linkage to care estimates in South Korea. Methods: A total 268,422 examinees ≥ 20 years old were included in 2015 from 33 medical institutions nationwide. Electronically extracted data were retrospectively analyzed to calculate the age-, sex-, and area-adjusted anti-HCV prevalence. Seroprevalence in 2015 was measured using the same method as that in 2009. For anti-HCV-positive subjects, medical records were reviewed to see whether HCV RNA testing or antiviral treatment was performed. Results: Adjusted anti-HCV prevalence was 0.60% (95% confidence interval, 0.57–0.63) based on general Korean population in 2015. It showed an increasing trend according to age; 0.23% in thirties, 0.38% in forties, 0.63% in fifties, 1.08% in sixties, and 1.65% in those aged ≥ 70 years. From 2009 to 2015, the adjusted anti-HCV prevalence decreased by 30%, with odds ratio of 0.70 (95% CI 0.70–0.71). There was significant intranational regional variation and changing pattern of seroprevalence. Among 1359 anti-HCV-positive subjects, HCV RNA test was performed in 60% and 25.4% had positivity. Treatment-initiated and cured rates in 2015 were 18.5% and 10.9%, respectively. Conclusions: Anti-HCV prevalence in South Korea was 0.6% in 2015, showing a 30% decrease from that in 2009. Although the HCV RNA testing rate was increased since 2009, this remains suboptimal. Moreover, the treatment uptake rate should be improved in South Korea.

AB - Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) requires epidemiological monitoring to estimate its disease burden and to develop countermeasures. This study aimed to investigate the difference between the 2015 and 2009 nationwide anti-HCV seroprevalence and to determine linkage to care estimates in South Korea. Methods: A total 268,422 examinees ≥ 20 years old were included in 2015 from 33 medical institutions nationwide. Electronically extracted data were retrospectively analyzed to calculate the age-, sex-, and area-adjusted anti-HCV prevalence. Seroprevalence in 2015 was measured using the same method as that in 2009. For anti-HCV-positive subjects, medical records were reviewed to see whether HCV RNA testing or antiviral treatment was performed. Results: Adjusted anti-HCV prevalence was 0.60% (95% confidence interval, 0.57–0.63) based on general Korean population in 2015. It showed an increasing trend according to age; 0.23% in thirties, 0.38% in forties, 0.63% in fifties, 1.08% in sixties, and 1.65% in those aged ≥ 70 years. From 2009 to 2015, the adjusted anti-HCV prevalence decreased by 30%, with odds ratio of 0.70 (95% CI 0.70–0.71). There was significant intranational regional variation and changing pattern of seroprevalence. Among 1359 anti-HCV-positive subjects, HCV RNA test was performed in 60% and 25.4% had positivity. Treatment-initiated and cured rates in 2015 were 18.5% and 10.9%, respectively. Conclusions: Anti-HCV prevalence in South Korea was 0.6% in 2015, showing a 30% decrease from that in 2009. Although the HCV RNA testing rate was increased since 2009, this remains suboptimal. Moreover, the treatment uptake rate should be improved in South Korea.

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U2 - 10.1007/s12072-019-09975-y

DO - 10.1007/s12072-019-09975-y

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JO - Hepatology International

JF - Hepatology International

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