The Differential Effect of Ego-Resiliency on the Relationship between Emotional Labor and Salivary Cortisol Level in Bank Clerks

You Kyung Lim, Soo Jin Cho, Sung Min, Jeong Hoon Park, Soo Hyun Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Elevated stress levels in emotional laborers has been documented in a number of studies. To minimize the negative effects of stress, the need to examine potential protective factors has been highlighted. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the differential moderating effect of ego-resiliency on the relationship between emotional labor and salivary cortisol level by comparing two groups of bank clerks deemed to experience different degree of emotional labor. Twenty-four bank clerks working in regional branch offices who provided face-to-face customer service (customer service group) and 33 administrative-duty bank clerks who work without face-to-face customer service (administrative work group) were recruited to participate in the study. Participants were asked to draw saliva into a specimen tube at an identical time during a work day and complete self-report scales measuring emotional labor and ego-resiliency. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine the interaction effect of ego-resiliency on the relationship between emotional labor and salivary cortisol level by controlling for gender, age and education level as covariates. The results demonstrated that the degree of emotional labor reported by the customer service group was higher than that of the administrative work group. Furthermore, ego-resiliency moderated the relationship between emotional labor and cortisol levels in the customer service group but not in the administrative work group. The implications and limitations of this study are discussed along with suggestions for future research.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume15
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Nov 17

Fingerprint

Ego
Hydrocortisone
Saliva
Self Report
Regression Analysis
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

@article{c6725e4cf7994a97bfe7e1d7ec2f6799,
title = "The Differential Effect of Ego-Resiliency on the Relationship between Emotional Labor and Salivary Cortisol Level in Bank Clerks",
abstract = "Elevated stress levels in emotional laborers has been documented in a number of studies. To minimize the negative effects of stress, the need to examine potential protective factors has been highlighted. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the differential moderating effect of ego-resiliency on the relationship between emotional labor and salivary cortisol level by comparing two groups of bank clerks deemed to experience different degree of emotional labor. Twenty-four bank clerks working in regional branch offices who provided face-to-face customer service (customer service group) and 33 administrative-duty bank clerks who work without face-to-face customer service (administrative work group) were recruited to participate in the study. Participants were asked to draw saliva into a specimen tube at an identical time during a work day and complete self-report scales measuring emotional labor and ego-resiliency. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine the interaction effect of ego-resiliency on the relationship between emotional labor and salivary cortisol level by controlling for gender, age and education level as covariates. The results demonstrated that the degree of emotional labor reported by the customer service group was higher than that of the administrative work group. Furthermore, ego-resiliency moderated the relationship between emotional labor and cortisol levels in the customer service group but not in the administrative work group. The implications and limitations of this study are discussed along with suggestions for future research.",
author = "Lim, {You Kyung} and Cho, {Soo Jin} and Sung Min and Park, {Jeong Hoon} and Park, {Soo Hyun}",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "17",
doi = "10.3390/ijerph15112576",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
journal = "International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health",
issn = "1661-7827",
publisher = "Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)",
number = "11",

}

The Differential Effect of Ego-Resiliency on the Relationship between Emotional Labor and Salivary Cortisol Level in Bank Clerks. / Lim, You Kyung; Cho, Soo Jin; Min, Sung; Park, Jeong Hoon; Park, Soo Hyun.

In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Vol. 15, No. 11, 17.11.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Differential Effect of Ego-Resiliency on the Relationship between Emotional Labor and Salivary Cortisol Level in Bank Clerks

AU - Lim, You Kyung

AU - Cho, Soo Jin

AU - Min, Sung

AU - Park, Jeong Hoon

AU - Park, Soo Hyun

PY - 2018/11/17

Y1 - 2018/11/17

N2 - Elevated stress levels in emotional laborers has been documented in a number of studies. To minimize the negative effects of stress, the need to examine potential protective factors has been highlighted. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the differential moderating effect of ego-resiliency on the relationship between emotional labor and salivary cortisol level by comparing two groups of bank clerks deemed to experience different degree of emotional labor. Twenty-four bank clerks working in regional branch offices who provided face-to-face customer service (customer service group) and 33 administrative-duty bank clerks who work without face-to-face customer service (administrative work group) were recruited to participate in the study. Participants were asked to draw saliva into a specimen tube at an identical time during a work day and complete self-report scales measuring emotional labor and ego-resiliency. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine the interaction effect of ego-resiliency on the relationship between emotional labor and salivary cortisol level by controlling for gender, age and education level as covariates. The results demonstrated that the degree of emotional labor reported by the customer service group was higher than that of the administrative work group. Furthermore, ego-resiliency moderated the relationship between emotional labor and cortisol levels in the customer service group but not in the administrative work group. The implications and limitations of this study are discussed along with suggestions for future research.

AB - Elevated stress levels in emotional laborers has been documented in a number of studies. To minimize the negative effects of stress, the need to examine potential protective factors has been highlighted. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the differential moderating effect of ego-resiliency on the relationship between emotional labor and salivary cortisol level by comparing two groups of bank clerks deemed to experience different degree of emotional labor. Twenty-four bank clerks working in regional branch offices who provided face-to-face customer service (customer service group) and 33 administrative-duty bank clerks who work without face-to-face customer service (administrative work group) were recruited to participate in the study. Participants were asked to draw saliva into a specimen tube at an identical time during a work day and complete self-report scales measuring emotional labor and ego-resiliency. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine the interaction effect of ego-resiliency on the relationship between emotional labor and salivary cortisol level by controlling for gender, age and education level as covariates. The results demonstrated that the degree of emotional labor reported by the customer service group was higher than that of the administrative work group. Furthermore, ego-resiliency moderated the relationship between emotional labor and cortisol levels in the customer service group but not in the administrative work group. The implications and limitations of this study are discussed along with suggestions for future research.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85056715100&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85056715100&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3390/ijerph15112576

DO - 10.3390/ijerph15112576

M3 - Article

C2 - 30453655

AN - SCOPUS:85056715100

VL - 15

JO - International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

JF - International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

SN - 1661-7827

IS - 11

ER -