The differential effects of repetitive magnetic stimulation in an in vitro neuronal model of ischemia/reperfusion injury

Ahreum Baek, Ji Hyun Kim, Soonil Pyo, Joon Ho Jung, Eun Jee Park, Sung Hoon Kim, Sung-Rae Cho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a non-invasive therapy that has been implicated in treatment of serious neurological disorders. However, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the effects of rTMS remain unclear. Therefore, this study examined the differential effects of repetitive magnetic stimulation (rMS) in an in vitro neuronal model of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, depending on low and high frequency. Neuro-2a cells were differentiated with retinoic acid and established for in vitro neuronal model of I/R injury under a subsequent 3 h of oxygen and glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R) condition. After the I/R injury, the differentiated neuronal cells were stimulated with rMS on day 1 and randomly divided into three groups: OGD/R+sham, OGD/R+low-frequency, and OGD/R+high-frequency groups. High-frequency rMS increases cell proliferation through activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases and AKT-signaling pathway and inhibits apoptosis in OGD/R-injured cells. Furthermore, high-frequency rMS increases Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)-cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) signaling pathway, further leading to alternation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression and synaptic plasticity in OGD/R injured cells. These results verified the neurobiological mechanisms of frequency-dependent rMS in I/R injury-treated neuronal cells. These mechanisms will help develop more powerful and credible rTMS stimulation treatment protocols.

Original languageEnglish
Article number50
JournalFrontiers in Neurology
Volume9
Issue numberFEB
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Feb 13

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Reperfusion Injury
Oxygen
Glucose
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type 2
Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein
Neuronal Plasticity
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor
Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases
Clinical Protocols
Tretinoin
Nervous System Diseases
In Vitro Techniques
Cell Proliferation
Apoptosis
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Baek, Ahreum ; Kim, Ji Hyun ; Pyo, Soonil ; Jung, Joon Ho ; Park, Eun Jee ; Kim, Sung Hoon ; Cho, Sung-Rae. / The differential effects of repetitive magnetic stimulation in an in vitro neuronal model of ischemia/reperfusion injury. In: Frontiers in Neurology. 2018 ; Vol. 9, No. FEB.
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The differential effects of repetitive magnetic stimulation in an in vitro neuronal model of ischemia/reperfusion injury. / Baek, Ahreum; Kim, Ji Hyun; Pyo, Soonil; Jung, Joon Ho; Park, Eun Jee; Kim, Sung Hoon; Cho, Sung-Rae.

In: Frontiers in Neurology, Vol. 9, No. FEB, 50, 13.02.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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