The effect of Medicaid physician fees on take-up of public health insurance among children in poverty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

I investigate how changes in fees paid to Medicaid physicians affect take-up among children in low-income families. The existing literature suggests that the low level of Medicaid fee payments to physicians reduces their willingness to see Medicaid patients, thus creating an access-to-care problem for these patients. For the identical service, current Medicaid reimbursement rates are only about 65 percent of those covered by Medicare. Increasing the relative payments of Medicaid would increase its perceived value, as it would provide better access to health care for Medicaid beneficiaries. Using variation in the timing of the changes in Medicaid payment across states, I find that increasing Medicaid generosity is associated with both an increase in take-up and a reduction in uninsured rate. These results provide a partial answer to the puzzling question of why many low-income children who are eligible for Medicaid remain uninsured.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)452-462
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Health Economics
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Mar 1

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Fees and Charges
Medicaid
Poverty
Health Insurance
Public Health
Physicians
Health Services Accessibility
Medicare
Patient Care

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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abstract = "I investigate how changes in fees paid to Medicaid physicians affect take-up among children in low-income families. The existing literature suggests that the low level of Medicaid fee payments to physicians reduces their willingness to see Medicaid patients, thus creating an access-to-care problem for these patients. For the identical service, current Medicaid reimbursement rates are only about 65 percent of those covered by Medicare. Increasing the relative payments of Medicaid would increase its perceived value, as it would provide better access to health care for Medicaid beneficiaries. Using variation in the timing of the changes in Medicaid payment across states, I find that increasing Medicaid generosity is associated with both an increase in take-up and a reduction in uninsured rate. These results provide a partial answer to the puzzling question of why many low-income children who are eligible for Medicaid remain uninsured.",
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The effect of Medicaid physician fees on take-up of public health insurance among children in poverty. / Hahn, Youjin.

In: Journal of Health Economics, Vol. 32, No. 2, 01.03.2013, p. 452-462.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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